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Author Topic: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'  (Read 26042 times)

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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #80 on: November 08, 2006, 11:57:11 AM »

Quote

And yes I remember Raju Bharatan too. Wish I could remember all others….


Ramamurthy for the matches played in Chennai...
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #81 on: November 08, 2006, 12:05:13 PM »

Quote

And yes I remember Raju Bharatan too. Wish I could remember all others….


Ramamurthy for the matches played in Chennai...
There was Darryl Crasto for the times mainly used to cover other sports by ocassionally cricket too and he was quite good.

SK Sham was also quite nice though never wrote much in Mumbai
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #82 on: November 08, 2006, 12:06:57 PM »

Indeed Ravi. Not a bad attack at all, and don’t forget Binny and Chetan Sharma were there too. However,  the best person of that tournament of course was Sadanand Vishwanath. What  a keeper!! Kundaran, Engineer, Kirmani ( I know I am exaggerating a bit…) all rolled into one. Honestly a superb one. If he had to hang around, Kiran More would never have had a chance. What a pity that he just fell away. In fact I feel Sadanand Vishwanath and Sivaramkrishnan and to an extent Kambli are the enduring tragedies of modern day Indian Cricket..

Gavaskar has written a book on this tournament, called "One day wonders".  Reading it you realise what captaincy is all about in terms of strategy and thinking on the feet...
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #83 on: November 08, 2006, 12:07:42 PM »

From a report in 2003

At 71, Jasdev Singh, the ace commentator who painted vivid word pictures of Indian
sporting triumphs and failures on the sports field, is going strong. He is getting ready to hold the mike again for live commentary in Hindi for the Independence Day celebrations in Red Fort. This would make it the 42nd broadcast of the Independence Day celebrations. From 1962, he has just missed one year as he was out of India for a sport event. In an era where commentators have their 15 minutes of fame, before the fresh batch takes over, Singh's voice refuses to leave the airwaves.

Hindi is not Singh's mother tongue. It is Punjabi and Urdu was his language in school. Yet Singh speaks such un-bookish Hindi that he has been honoured with awards for his contribution to popularisation of the national language. In the days when the language channels had not come of age and television was confined to Delhi and Mumbai, Singh ruled the air waves with his commentaries for All India Radio.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cricket action was described by the wordsmiths like Devaraj Puri, Anant Setalvad, Suresh Saraiya, Balu Alaganan, Ravi Chaturvedi and Sushil Doshi in the earlier years, now both radio and television are looking at retired players and sometimes even active players who have taken a break due to injury or otherwise. Cricket is setting the example for other games. Barring a few none of these professionals are chosen for their voice or for their grip on the vocabulary.

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k-slice

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #84 on: November 08, 2006, 12:09:46 PM »

this is by far the best thread ever on this DG. i was only 2 years od and hence dont remember jack of the wc. but at 4, in 1985 my dad used to wake me up and we use dto watch the games till he had to go to work.
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #85 on: November 08, 2006, 12:14:49 PM »

Indeed Ravi. Not a bad attack at all, and don’t forget Binny and Chetan Sharma were there too. However,  the best person of that tournament of course was Sadanand Vishwanath. What  a keeper!! Kundaran, Engineer, Kirmani ( I know I am exaggerating a bit…) all rolled into one. Honestly a superb one. If he had to hang around, Kiran More would never have had a chance. What a pity that he just fell away. In fact I feel Sadanand Vishwanath and Sivaramkrishnan and to an extent Kambli are the enduring tragedies of modern day Indian Cricket..

Gavaskar has written a book on this tournament, called "One day wonders".  Reading it you realise what captaincy is all about in terms of strategy and thinking on the feet...

Did not miss that one...a few pages exclusively on Sadanand....You are right...SV, LS ..two of the worst cricketing tragedies ever...And I know LS at a personal level too...he was extremely focussed in his earlier days... would walk all the way to my cousin's place to borrow his bat for some key local matches(my cousin was one of the few those days to own a Duncan Fearnley bat brought in from UK) and would talk with so much passion about his performance....
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #86 on: November 08, 2006, 12:17:42 PM »

From a report in 2003

At 71, Jasdev Singh, the ace commentator who painted vivid word pictures of Indian
sporting triumphs and failures on the sports field, is going strong. He is getting ready to hold the mike again for live commentary in Hindi for the Independence Day celebrations in Red Fort. This would make it the 42nd broadcast of the Independence Day celebrations. From 1962, he has just missed one year as he was out of India for a sport event. In an era where commentators have their 15 minutes of fame, before the fresh batch takes over, Singh's voice refuses to leave the airwaves.

Hindi is not Singh's mother tongue. It is Punjabi and Urdu was his language in school. Yet Singh speaks such un-bookish Hindi that he has been honoured with awards for his contribution to popularisation of the national language. In the days when the language channels had not come of age and television was confined to Delhi and Mumbai, Singh ruled the air waves with his commentaries for All India Radio.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cricket action was described by the wordsmiths like Devaraj Puri, Anant Setalvad, Suresh Saraiya, Balu Alaganan, Ravi Chaturvedi and Sushil Doshi in the earlier years, now both radio and television are looking at retired players and sometimes even active players who have taken a break due to injury or otherwise. Cricket is setting the example for other games. Barring a few none of these professionals are chosen for their voice or for their grip on the vocabulary.



you are forgetting Kameshwar the other very very eloquent speaker himself and another veteran of Republic Day Parades.

Among all these names we are forgetting our own Mr Bhogle who like Suresh Sariya and Anant Setalvad etc held a day job yet did commentary.
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #87 on: November 08, 2006, 12:18:57 PM »

Indeed Ravi. Not a bad attack at all, and don’t forget Binny and Chetan Sharma were there too. However,  the best person of that tournament of course was Sadanand Vishwanath. What  a keeper!! Kundaran, Engineer, Kirmani ( I know I am exaggerating a bit…) all rolled into one. Honestly a superb one. If he had to hang around, Kiran More would never have had a chance. What a pity that he just fell away. In fact I feel Sadanand Vishwanath and Sivaramkrishnan and to an extent Kambli are the enduring tragedies of modern day Indian Cricket..

Gavaskar has written a book on this tournament, called "One day wonders".  Reading it you realise what captaincy is all about in terms of strategy and thinking on the feet...

Did not miss that one...a few pages exclusively on Sadanand....You are right...SV, LS ..two of the worst cricketing tragedies ever...And I know LS at a personal level too...he was extremely focussed in his earlier days... would walk all the way to my cousin's place to borrow his bat for some key local matches(my cousin was one of the few those days to own a Duncan Fearnley bat brought in from UK) and would talk with so much passion about his performance....

Is it true that LS, SV and even to an extent the Kerala offie Ananthapadmanabhan's career went down the tube because of dope?
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k-slice

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #88 on: November 08, 2006, 12:21:43 PM »

ravi1010
you have mentioned you knew LS personally. i would appreciate if you could tell us a little more about his sudden and sad drop from top level cricket. ofcourse i understand you might not be able to tell all but it still baffles me that a spinner of his ability went downhill so fast.
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #89 on: November 08, 2006, 12:26:38 PM »

LS for a fact I know used to smoke, hiding away from reporters...he did that in a theatre we had been to watch a movie...now I remember "Carry on behind" ...heard that he graduated to other high end stuff ..but not as a regular...Drinking ..yes...

SV...I have heard again...some even saw him in a local bus asking for money to help him...

Sad state of affairs....

And look at the current crop of players...RD , AK , SRT...so disciplined and focussed....and the money has also grown by the heap in these few years.....

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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #90 on: November 08, 2006, 12:29:16 PM »

Indeed Ravi. Not a bad attack at all, and don’t forget Binny and Chetan Sharma were there too. However,  the best person of that tournament of course was Sadanand Vishwanath. What  a keeper!! Kundaran, Engineer, Kirmani ( I know I am exaggerating a bit…) all rolled into one. Honestly a superb one. If he had to hang around, Kiran More would never have had a chance. What a pity that he just fell away. In fact I feel Sadanand Vishwanath and Sivaramkrishnan and to an extent Kambli are the enduring tragedies of modern day Indian Cricket..

Gavaskar has written a book on this tournament, called "One day wonders".  Reading it you realise what captaincy is all about in terms of strategy and thinking on the feet...

I infact remember the whole series the first match I think was against the Aussies who had Carl Rackeman making a come back and I think they also had Rodney Hogg in the line up.

They were shot out for 169 and we scored the runs rather easily, we then beat Eng I think and then in the semi's we beat Kiwi's and finally the Paki's.

Imran's catch by SV in the finals was a clear example of how SV kept his wits about him, it is a kiss off the glove from a not so high bouncer.
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #91 on: November 08, 2006, 12:38:40 PM »

Ravi,
Thanks for reminding about Balu Alaganan, how could I forget? Another great one. He and Saraiyya would use  a slightly bombastic style and used clichés of those days like "all the way for four" or "a cheeky single"etc.

Suddz,

As far as Cricket writers go, don't forget K. N. Prabhu for  Times. S. K. Sham did write in Mumbai for a paper called Free Press Journal for quite some time. Don't also forget Busybee writing first for Evening News, then Mid-Day till he started his own Afternoon Dispatch Courier. His Cricket predictions in his "Round-and -about" would always come out to be true.

The for Maharashtra Times there was V. V. Karmarkar, another superb Cricket Columnist
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There were whispers those days about Siva's  drinking and being on drugs etc. Apparently Sadanand Vishwanath had some tragedy in his family, both his parents died one after the other and he too then fell away and got on  drugs. But honestly, what a keeper!! I really don’t know why one of the seniors or office bearers  didn’t take him under their wings and guided him. We lost a gem..

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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #92 on: November 08, 2006, 12:46:09 PM »

Ravi,
Thanks for reminding about Balu Alaganan, how could I forget? Another great one. He and Saraiyya would use  a slightly bombastic style and used clichés of those days like "all the way for four" or "a cheeky single"etc.

Suddz,

As far as Cricket writers go, don't forget K. N. Prabhu for  Times. S. K. Sham did write in Mumbai for a paper called Free Press Journal for quite some time. Don't also forget Busybee writing first for Evening News, then Mid-Day till he started his own Afternoon Dispatch Courier. His Cricket predictions in his "Round-and -about" would always come out to be true.

The for Maharashtra Times there was V. V. Karmarkar, another superb Cricket Columnist
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There were whispers those days about Siva's  drinking and being on drugs etc. Apparently Sadanand Vishwanath had some tragedy in his family, both his parents died one after the other and he too then fell away and got on  drugs. But honestly, what a keeper!! I really don’t know why one of the seniors or office bearers  didn’t take him under their wings and guided him. We lost a gem..



CnB,
Oh my god how could I forget KN Prabhu his articles used to almost paint the entire match infront of you as if you were watching it live.

Amazing stuff. Busy Bee was god his writing was of the highest order.

Was it Karmarkar or Kanitkar who wrote for MT, (Patra nahve mitra incidentally was one of the best campaigns for a newspaper I have seen).

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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #93 on: November 08, 2006, 12:57:07 PM »

Sudzz, it was Karmarkar. Wow, you remember Patra navhe Mitra?? Impressive!! Sadly it is not the same any more.K. N. Prabhu died soemdays ago. My allowance during my last year in college was Rs30 a month ( for 15 days of practicals X  Rs2 per day for covering  Masala dosa and Chai) I would spend it all on News papers we couldn't afford and hope  my mates in college would pay for my dosa and chai (which they always did!!)

Busy bee indeed was God. His loves were humour, food and Cricket…in that order
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achutank

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #94 on: November 08, 2006, 01:08:08 PM »

'85 was a completely different experience. The first of the Channel 9 telecasts beemed into India. Early morning alarms, hot cup of coffee whil India was steamrolling the opponents...The angry duck across the screen, the varied angles, the villianous pad buckle of Howarth, the Kapil Dev yorker to Qasim Omar,Srikkanth's dropped catch of Lance Cairns and subsequently taking it, SMG's lowering of his sun hat to cover his amusement, Kapil and DV taking us to victory in the SF, Srikkanth's blitzkrieg against Eng with special treatment to Norman Cowans

Amazing games...childhood memories will remain etched...

For those who think that Jayasuriya was the first proponent of hitting "over the top" in the first 15, watch these matches.......

Childhood…?? I was already a corporate slave by then. Anyway, yes I remember all those things mentioned by you about 85. The Indian team didn’t lose a single match in that tournament and beat all the stalwarts on their way to the final (except WI who were in the other group). The enduring memory of course is  all the team members all over the place in Ravi Shastri's Audi Quattro….after the final

And yes I remember Raju Bharatan too. Wish I could remember all others….



c& B by my watch you should be dead. :))
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #95 on: November 08, 2006, 01:10:08 PM »

Sudzz, it was Karmarkar. Wow, you remember Patra navhe Mitra?? Impressive!! Sadly it is not the same any more.K. N. Prabhu died soemdays ago. My allowance during my last year in college was Rs30 a month ( for 15 days of practicals X  Rs2 per day for covering  Masala dosa and Chai) I would spend it all on News papers we couldn't afford and hope  my mates in college would pay for my dosa and chai (which they always did!!)

Busy bee indeed was God. His loves were humour, food and Cricket…in that order


those were indeed the days...food, friends and the ocassional thums up....

I dont know why but I strongly believe that the overall happiness quotient was higher than it is now.

Iam sure even my parents had much less cynicism even though making ends meet was a struggle yet I somehow feel life in general was happier till about the late 80's.
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #96 on: November 08, 2006, 01:12:40 PM »


c& B by my watch you should be dead. :))

Achutan, change your watch mate. I am still ticking and doing pretty well by the grace of God.. ;)
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LosingNow

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #97 on: November 08, 2006, 03:48:04 PM »

We should split this thread into "JW's Indian Summers" and "Nostalgia" threads!!
--

Alright C&B, Sudzz... it is amazing to read all these parallels.

I guess most of us in the middle-class had similar upbringing back in the 80s..irrespective of where we lived.

Sudzz: I have had this discussion about happiness with a lot of my childhood friends. You are right ...for some reason everyone was happier/more content then ..even though, as you said, it was a struggle when it came to making ends meet. Very interesting!!
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #98 on: November 08, 2006, 04:08:00 PM »

dont split it. in a way you guys are talking about Indian Summers too, but not the book.
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justforkix

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #99 on: November 08, 2006, 04:12:19 PM »

dont split it. in a way you guys are talking about Indian Summers too, but not the book.

1985 was Australian Summer or Indian winter  :D :D :D
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #100 on: November 08, 2006, 04:15:37 PM »

LN
Indeed, this thread has nothing to do with it's title anymore. Can it actually be split? I would agree with Sudzz, you and others in that the life was hard but much simpler and hence easier to handle and perhaps enjoy. Middle class families were the same everywhere so I suppose money was always short in supply and hence much more valued. People were generally a lot less stressed and found happiness in small and not necessarily material things.

Today, there is a lot of material prosperity but increasing emptiness, stress   and loneliness.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Championship 85 was in March, March 9th was the final if I remember correctly….so it was Indian spring actually..
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #101 on: November 08, 2006, 04:25:35 PM »

LN
Indeed, this thread has nothing to do with it's title anymore. Can it actually be split? I would agree with Sudzz, you and others in that the life was hard but much simpler and hence easier to handle and perhaps enjoy. Middle class families were the same everywhere so I suppose money was always short in supply and hence much more valued. People were generally a lot less stressed and found happiness in small and not necessarily material things.

Today, there is a lot of material prosperity but increasing emptiness, stress   and loneliness.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Championship 85 was in March, March 9th was the final if I remember correctly….so it was Indian spring actually..
I just wrote a long post and deleted it because somewhere along the lines eyes got clouded over and I could not type...I was thinking of exactly what CnB typed I do have more money now than my dad did but I also feel he was much much more happy than I was.

He could come back home from work, not bother about phone calls (there was no phone toh kaise aata), Saturday's were working Sundays were not. He and my mom used to go walking everyday ( a pleasure I cant afford due erratic schedules we all follow).

I used to get back from school, do my homework, go out to play, get back home, have a bath, eat and sleep (in between watch TV), my children go to school come back do home work, go for organised activities including playtime at parks etc.

Its a completely different ball game now...
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #102 on: November 08, 2006, 04:27:33 PM »

Quote
life was hard but much simpler and hence easier to handle and perhaps enjoy. Middle class families were the same everywhere so I suppose money was always short in supply and hence much more valued. People were generally a lot less stressed and found happiness in small and not necessarily material things.

Today, there is a lot of material prosperity but increasing emptiness, stress   and loneliness.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CnB...I am not sure if this is completely true. Lot of things change as we go along. My parents were happy inspite of the fact that their teens were spent in the pre independence era..They probably felt the same stress and tilt towards material issues like what we feel today. Our children think that this is probably the best period in their life...Everything is accessible, most things are affordable eg.,being cars as the preferred mode of travel...more from a  safety and ease of travel perspective rather than a luxury unlike earlier...

But, yes the stress levels have increased because of increased competetiveness and need to achieve things faster. To that extent maybe what you write makes logical sense...
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #103 on: November 08, 2006, 04:38:27 PM »

Ravi, I have been living in Europe for the last so many years, so perhaps, I was writing from the western perspective....my impression every time I come to India (at  least twice a year) is that we are going exactly the same way as the west. I live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world but there is so much of unhappiness here, life is so complicated.

I agree lots of things have changed in India for the better and thats something which adds to the qaulity of life in general. However, I probably had values, attitudes etc. in mind

I just meant that life was very simple in India in the 70s and 80s and inspite of lack of material wealth people were contented. I am not so sure if that is still the case...
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undercover

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #104 on: November 08, 2006, 04:39:18 PM »

LS for a fact I know used to smoke, hiding away from reporters...he did that in a theatre we had been to watch a movie...now I remember "Carry on behind" ...heard that he graduated to other high end stuff ..but not as a regular...Drinking ..yes...

SV...I have heard again...some even saw him in a local bus asking for money to help him...

Sad state of affairs....

And look at the current crop of players...RD , AK , SRT...so disciplined and focussed....and the money has also grown by the heap in these few years.....



Players from TN lead the list I think …W.V. Raman used to be chain smoker and so was Srikkanth . I remember when Raman was first dropped from the team and in wilderness his father (astrologer) predicted he would make a come back to the team. Raman scored heavily in that season and made it to the team. But his smoking and lack of stamina brought him down again . S. Ramesh …another character  ;)

Exception …Shady guy  Raju  ..did all but still held on .
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #105 on: November 08, 2006, 04:44:01 PM »

Ravi, I have been living in Europe for the last so many years, so perhaps, I was writing from the western perspective....my impression every time I come to India (at  least twice a year) is that we are going exactly the same way as the west. I live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world but there is so much of unhappiness here, life is so complicated.

I agree lots of things have changed in India for the better and thats something which adds to the qaulity of life in general. However, I probably had values, attitudes etc. in mind

I just meant that life was very simple in India in the 70s and 80s and inspite of lack of material wealth people were contented. I am not so sure if that is still the case...

Not denying what you say...maybe our children will think we were happy and contented....

Attitudes and values...I completely agree...more erosion by the day.
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #106 on: November 08, 2006, 04:59:20 PM »

Its a completely different ball game now...

Sudzz, I am with you....all the way!! I know how its feels. For some reason an old Hindi Kishor Kumar song has been playing in my head, as I was writing here thru out the day:

"Koi lauta de mere beete huae din..."
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undercover

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #107 on: November 08, 2006, 06:03:08 PM »

Its a completely different ball game now...

Sudzz, I am with you....all the way!! I know how its feels. For some reason an old Hindi Kishor Kumar song has been playing in my head, as I was writing here thru out the day:

"Koi lauta de mere beete huae din..."

That sounds like Prem Panicker  :'(
« Last Edit: November 08, 2006, 07:01:28 PM by undercover »
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LosingNow

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #108 on: November 08, 2006, 07:57:56 PM »

LN
Indeed, this thread has nothing to do with it's title anymore. Can it actually be split? I would agree with Sudzz, you and others in that the life was hard but much simpler and hence easier to handle and perhaps enjoy. Middle class families were the same everywhere so I suppose money was always short in supply and hence much more valued. People were generally a lot less stressed and found happiness in small and not necessarily material things.

Today, there is a lot of material prosperity but increasing emptiness, stress   and loneliness.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Championship 85 was in March, March 9th was the final if I remember correctly….so it was Indian spring actually..
I just wrote a long post and deleted it because somewhere along the lines eyes got clouded over and I could not type
Let's see it...
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LosingNow

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #109 on: November 08, 2006, 07:59:24 PM »

Ravi, I have been living in Europe for the last so many years, so perhaps, I was writing from the western perspective....my impression every time I come to India (at  least twice a year) is that we are going exactly the same way as the west. I live in one of the most prosperous countries in the world but there is so much of unhappiness here, life is so complicated.

I agree lots of things have changed in India for the better and thats something which adds to the qaulity of life in general. However, I probably had values, attitudes etc. in mind

I just meant that life was very simple in India in the 70s and 80s and inspite of lack of material wealth people were contented. I am not so sure if that is still the case...
True .. the Amish have it all figured out.
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Cover Point

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #110 on: November 08, 2006, 09:48:28 PM »

Wow. Wow Wow!

I came to this thread late but has been an immensely nostalgic experience. Nothing really left to say. Most people have described exactly the feelings of growing up in the 80's or watching the WC final or the 85 trophy (which we actually got to see in color since my uncle had brought us our new SONY trinitron color tv... one that my parents still have and it still works!)

So why do we think things for kids are different today than what we saw? Could it be because in those days the middle class or should I say the working class was pretty much all at about the same level. You were either very rich and got to go to 5 star hotels or were in the middle class and pretty much shared very similar things. Today the affordability and experiences etc are very varied.

Those were simpler times with fewer things to compete on. Most houses had one tv. One refrigerator... fewer brands to chose from ....

More time spent interacting with kids. There was usually no TV to speak of. The twice a week Chitrahar was very welcome and pretty much everyone watched it. But that was just 30 minutes ...twice a week. Kids were forced to play outside a lot more.

Now, kids spend way too much time infront of a tv ... internet etc etc has taken the actual conversation out.

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CLR James

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #111 on: November 09, 2006, 01:09:59 AM »


Great stuff all you guys! The memories of that Indian summer of 1983 are still so vivid! At times I think kids nowadays have it too easy. In '83 I one had to contend with power cuts. When that happened, I remember Richards was in the middle of his short, 33 run blitzkrieg. Dad went to the phone and started calling all his friends. At last we contacted a house that still had electricity. It was a decision based on immense faith. We were, at that point sure that India would lose in the next 20 overs. Mom reminded both of us that I had school the next day. And then all of us, including my little sister, took a taxi to my dad's friend's place. And then stayed there till 3 am for the festivities. I have never seen such mass hysteria. It was unreal.

Now about commentators. Let me share memories of a Bengali one called Ajoy Bose, who all Bengalis will immediately recognize. Bose used to be a very good soccer inside forward in his younger days, but commentated very well in Bengali. Together with Kamal Bahttacharya as expert, they formed a memorable team. Bhattacharya was actually a very good medium pacer in his salad days who could have played for India. He played a stellar hand, taking seven wickets in the Ranji final of 1939, in which Bengal won, captained by Tom Longfield, who was, incidentally, the father-in-law of Douglas Jardine!

Anyway, here is how a typical Bose-Bhattacharya moment would be. I am translating as best as I can from Bengali:

"Glorious day at the Eden Gardens. The Sky is blue; the gallery is green. There is a gentle breeze blowing in from the Ganges....and how can one descirbe the lush green grass of Eden? Only a poet can do that...Anyway, three deliveries have been bowled by Boyce in the meantime...Gavaskar has played them defensively.....Yes, what was I saying? The green grass and the blue sky...it seems nature has painted these with her own hands..."
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kban1

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #112 on: November 09, 2006, 02:06:51 AM »

suddz:

Quote
Imran's catch by SV in the finals was a clear example of how SV kept his wits about him, it is a kiss off the glove from a not so high bouncer.

You are probably mixing up the dismissals. Imran was run out for 35 in the final -- direct hit by Gavaskar from point with only one stump to aim at.

I do agree though that Sadanand Vishwanath was the best keeper we had after Kirmani --the guy was brilliant!!

For an unforgettable SV moment, go back to the final and recall

Miandad stumped SV bowled LS    48
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Libran

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #113 on: November 09, 2006, 03:32:55 AM »

suddz:

Quote
Imran's catch by SV in the finals was a clear example of how SV kept his wits about him, it is a kiss off the glove from a not so high bouncer.

You are probably mixing up the dismissals. Imran was run out for 35 in the final -- direct hit by Gavaskar from point with only one stump to aim at.

I do agree though that Sadanand Vishwanath was the best keeper we had after Kirmani --the guy was brilliant!!

For an unforgettable SV moment, go back to the final and recall

Miandad stumped SV bowled LS    48

No kban...he is right..it was a catch taken...but not given by the umpire and left Sadanand hot under the collar...took a few people including SMG to cool him down
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sudzz

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #114 on: November 09, 2006, 03:45:30 AM »

suddz:

Quote
Imran's catch by SV in the finals was a clear example of how SV kept his wits about him, it is a kiss off the glove from a not so high bouncer.

You are probably mixing up the dismissals. Imran was run out for 35 in the final -- direct hit by Gavaskar from point with only one stump to aim at.

I do agree though that Sadanand Vishwanath was the best keeper we had after Kirmani --the guy was brilliant!!

For an unforgettable SV moment, go back to the final and recall

Miandad stumped SV bowled LS    48

No kban...he is right..it was a catch taken...but not given by the umpire and left Sadanand hot under the collar...took a few people including SMG to cool him down

Kban I guess you are right I referred to the score card, but I clearly remember the catch that he took every one around him had sort lost sight of what was happening around him, the ball came from Imran's gloves and Imran is a tall bloke he was almost blind sighted but still caught the ball and appealed and the replays showed that the ump got it all wrong.
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caught and bowled

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #115 on: November 09, 2006, 11:29:58 AM »

Most of the older Americans or Europeans would generally tell you what they were doing when Kennedy was assasinated. Going by what has been written in this thread so far, I think it would be safe to say  that quite a few us Indians would be able to say what theywere doing when WI came in to bat in the WC83  etc. and eventually when India won.

Ayyaz Memon and Tom Alter have written a book about 10 great Indian wins during the various world cups. It came out just before the last world cup. Can't remember the name off hand but I have it at home. Superb read for Cricket nostalgia buffs.

Lets just hope we get to have similar moments again during forthcoming world cups.

By the way, I have got two tickets for world cup in March-April (Follow the team pat was the best option) I am still trying to work out if it is going to be feasible in terms for flights,  accomodation etc. Wonder if any of you folks have any concrete plans
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

And yes, I remember clearly that Imran was out in 85 in Melbourne and not given..
« Last Edit: November 09, 2006, 11:34:11 AM by caught and bowled »
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toney

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #116 on: November 09, 2006, 02:33:24 PM »


Great stuff all you guys! The memories of that Indian summer of 1983 are still so vivid! At times I think kids nowadays have it too easy. In '83 I one had to contend with power cuts.
....

Really, CLR? ;D Well, I had to contend with two hour power cuts during the WC, 96. My aunt's house was 1.5kms away and I used to time everything to a nicety; if I remember correctly, there was no power cut for the Ind Pak match at Bangalore.

I dont quite agree that we dont need the materialistic luxuries we have today. I mean, what is wrong in having a couple of extra choices when buying a TV? Think about how useful the internet is! What was different and what I sorely miss is the loss of simplicity. All people, including close friends are increasingly competitive. Everyone wants to outdo the person next to him. And I think this competitiveness puts unnecessary stress on people. But is there any other option?
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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #117 on: November 09, 2006, 03:08:02 PM »

Most of the older Americans or Europeans would generally tell you what they were doing when Kennedy was assasinated. Going by what has been written in this thread so far, I think it would be safe to say  that quite a few us Indians would be able to say what theywere doing when WI came in to bat in the WC83  etc. and eventually when India won.

Ayyaz Memon and Tom Alter have written a book about 10 great Indian wins during the various world cups. It came out just before the last world cup. Can't remember the name off hand but I have it at home. Superb read for Cricket nostalgia buffs.

Lets just hope we get to have similar moments again during forthcoming world cups.

By the way, I have got two tickets for world cup in March-April (Follow the team pat was the best option) I am still trying to work out if it is going to be feasible in terms for flights,  accomodation etc. Wonder if any of you folks have any concrete plans
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

And yes, I remember clearly that Imran was out in 85 in Melbourne and not given..

SMG mentioned that incident in the “Sunny Days” and he did ask Imran about it during the break.

Last time ( 8-9 years back ) I saw SV was in KSCA stadium main gate standing under hot sun selling his memorabilia..Leather key chains, clips, wallets etc during Ind-NZ Test.
If you look back SV was a good WK but not known for batting. KM was better bat than him …

Also remember Kirmani was removed unceremoniously from the Indian team …and Kiri always considering a come back and was active with the Karnataka Team . There was a joint crowns caffe belong to Imtiaz Ahmed ( former Ranaji cricketer) on Brigade road next to the Brigade Towers in Bangalore  . It was a hot spot for all the cricketers . I was very small then to understand any politics but one thing we knew  that Kiri never liked SV …and the comparison with him. 

SV will be glad if he comes to know that we still discuss him. May be it's good idea to get SV ( I don’t know where he is now but will find out friends ) to chat with us in CricketVoice.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2006, 06:25:05 PM by undercover »
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CLR James

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #118 on: November 09, 2006, 03:18:38 PM »

Most of the older Americans or Europeans would generally tell you what they were doing when Kennedy was assasinated. Going by what has been written in this thread so far, I think it would be safe to say  that quite a few us Indians would be able to say what theywere doing when WI came in to bat in the WC83  etc. and eventually when India won.

Ayyaz Memon and Tom Alter have written a book about 10 great Indian wins during the various world cups. It came out just before the last world cup. Can't remember the name off hand but I have it at home. Superb read for Cricket nostalgia buffs.

Lets just hope we get to have similar moments again during forthcoming world cups.

By the way, I have got two tickets for world cup in March-April (Follow the team pat was the best option) I am still trying to work out if it is going to be feasible in terms for flights,  accomodation etc. Wonder if any of you folks have any concrete plans
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

And yes, I remember clearly that Imran was out in 85 in Melbourne and not given..

SMG mentioned that incident in the “Sunny Days” and he did ask Imran about it during the break.

Last time ( 8-9 years back ) I saw SV was in KSCA stadium main gate standing under hot sun selling his memorabilia..Leather key chains, clips, wallets etc during Ind-NZ Test.
If you look back SV was a good WK but not known for batting. KM was better bat than him …

Also remember Kirmani was removed unceremoniously from the Indian team …and Kiri always considering a come back and was active with the Karnataka Team . There was a joint crains caffe belong to Imtiaz Ahmed ( former Ranaji cricketer) on Brigade road next to the Brigade Towers in Bangalore  . It was a hot spot for all the cricketers . I was very small then to understand any politics but one thing we knew  that Kiri never liked SV …and the comparison with him. 

SV will be glad if he comes to know that we still discuss him. May be it's good idea to get SV ( I don’t know where he is now but will find out friends ) to chat with us in CricketVoice.



Undercover, SMG actually did not ask Imran about the caught behind incident during the break. During lunch he was surprised to see Imran (who would subsequently open the bowling and bowl a very testing initial spell of 5 overs for 7 runs to Shashtri and Srikanth) wolve down a tremendous amount of food, as if a famine was just around the corner. A surprised Gavaskar asked Imran what was going on. Imran misunderstood, thinking that SMG was asking about that 'not out' incident. He said that he was about to walk when he saw that the umpire had not raised his finger.
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CLR James

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Re: Excerpts From JW's 'Indian Summers'
« Reply #119 on: November 09, 2006, 03:23:19 PM »


Great stuff all you guys! The memories of that Indian summer of 1983 are still so vivid! At times I think kids nowadays have it too easy. In '83 I one had to contend with power cuts.
....

Really, CLR? ;D Well, I had to contend with two hour power cuts during the WC, 96. My aunt's house was 1.5kms away and I used to time everything to a nicety; if I remember correctly, there was no power cut for the Ind Pak match at Bangalore.

I dont quite agree that we dont need the materialistic luxuries we have today. I mean, what is wrong in having a couple of extra choices when buying a TV? Think about how useful the internet is! What was different and what I sorely miss is the loss of simplicity. All people, including close friends are increasingly competitive. Everyone wants to outdo the person next to him. And I think this competitiveness puts unnecessary stress on people. But is there any other option?

Ah yes Toney, what i meant was that when we were kids, we would have to wait for months and overcome technological limitations to see the works of our cricketing gods. This, in some ways, increased frustration, but also increased the thrill when it came. I remember I could not sleep for a couple of days before I was taken to see my first test match at Eden Gardens in 1979. I wanted to see SMG-Vishy bat, and Kapil bowl. They were spectral beings to me. For a kid of today, of course the opportunities are much much more. And that is good, but I cannot imagine them being so excited at the prospect of seeing SRT bat. It is just too much a part of their daily lives.
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