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Author Topic: God Particle discovery announced: Tracking down the Higgs boson particle  (Read 1254 times)

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Blwe_torch

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Tracking down the Higgs boson particle
Narayani Ganesh, TNN | Jul 3, 2012, 10.35PM IST



LINDAU: It's the Holy Grail of Physics and it's even more elusive than the Yeti but perhaps is not as mythical. The Higgs boson or 'God' particle has been sending scientists on a merry-go-round ever since Peter Higgs came out with the concept in 1964. However, this time around, says the announcement from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, where scientists have been smashing particles at high speed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the mysterious subatomic particle has left its footprints. Though no one has actually seen the particle, scientists are pretty sure that the shadows left in all the data crunching here are none other than those of the Higgs boson. Pinning down the particle that 'Higgs hunters' believe holds the key to explaining why the universe has mass is like trying to grasp the moonbeam in your hands. Yet, based on their findings so far, confident LHC scientists will announce on July 4 Wednesday the near-confirmation that the particle does indeed exist.

The Story of the Birth of the Universe

The ten billion dollar atom-smashing LHC has been investigating dark matter and anti-matter and trying to unravel the story of the creation of the universe -- finding the Higgs boson would be the final clincher. "It's unclear what the implications would be, unless of course the particle is going to be something different," clarifies Brian Schmidt, who won the Nobel in 2011 for discovering that the rate of expansion of the universe, far from slowing down, as you might expect billions of years after the Big Bang, is actually accelerating. He is here in Lindau, meeting up with students from across the world including 18 Indian students sponsored by the Department of Science and Technology and the German Research Foundation (DFG) and 26 other Nobel laureates invited by the 62nd Lindau Council for Nobel Laureate Meetings. This year's theme is Physics.

Cold, Dark And Exciting

When this correspondent asked Prof Schmidt to explain what he meant by 'different,' he said: "If the particle is a straight Higgs boson, then it is really about Quantum Mechanics and how things work in a small part of the universe. If it were to be a little different, it could indicate something beyond the standard model of the universe. So it really depends on what we learn tomorrow. Right now we don't know what dark matter is. If the particle is just normal Higgs boson, that would have nothing to do with dark matter. But if it were somehow different, if it does not exactly confirm to the theory of the standard model, then maybe we will be opening up the possibility of something bigger that would include eventually the particle that gives you cold, dark matter. That would be really exciting."

Martimus Veltman , the 1999 Physics Nobel laureate -- he got it for devising a mathematical system of predicting the properties of the subatomic particles that make up the universe - was saying here in Lindau that with an unstable nature, the Higgs boson tends to rapidly decay but if scientists do manage to pin it down, it would mean completing the standard model of the universe but it would also tantamount to closing the door. "So in a sense, discovery of the Higgs particle is a bad thing!" he says. "We'd probably have to just go home!"

While some members of the scientific community are eagerly looking forward to the CERN announcement tomorrow, few others say they would rather that the Higgs boson particle remains a mystery!


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/Tracking-down-the-Higgs-boson-particle/articleshow/14653042.cms
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Blwe_torch

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The CERN have just announced the discovery of God particle........after holding on to the announcement for a couple of months....(courtesy Reuter)


In particle physics, bosons are one of the two fundamental classes of subatomic particles, the other being fermions.
Bosons are characterized by their obedience to Bose–Einstein statistics. This class of particles includes photons and gluons, as well as the hypothetical Higgs boson. The name boson is derived from the surname of the Indian physicist, Satyendra Nath Bose, a contemporary of the German physicist  :love7:.
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RicePlateReddy

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The CERN have just announced the discovery of God particle........after holding on to the announcement for a couple of months....(courtesy Reuter)


In particle physics, bosons are one of the two fundamental classes of subatomic particles, the other being fermions.
Bosons are characterized by their obedience to Bose–Einstein statistics. This class of particles includes photons and gluons, as well as the hypothetical Higgs boson. The name boson is derived from the surname of the Indian physicist, Satyendra Nath Bose, a contemporary of the German physicist  :love7:.

It should have been named the Ganguly particle.
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Blwe_torch

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I was typing fine......i wonder, how that 'love' smilie got in!..........funny......... :)...there was nothing so lovely in this news, except for the highlighted Indian connection
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Blwe_torch

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God particle: ‘India is like a historic father of the project’
PTI | Jul 4, 2012, 09.28PM IST


KOLKATA/GENEVA: The discovery of a new sub-atomic particle that is crucial to understanding how the universe is built announced in Geneva today has an intrinsic Indian connection.

A large number of Indian scientists, representing the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Kolkata, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, Harishchandra Research Institute, Allahabad and Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, were involved in the world's most ambitious experiment over the years.

The Indian link to the world's ambitious experiment was also significantly reflected in comments ahead of the announcement by CERN scientists that a sub-atomic particle "consistent" with the Higgs boson or 'God particle' has been spotted.

"India is like a historic father of the project," said Paolo Giubellino, spokesperson of Geneva-based European Organisation for Nuclear Research, famously known as CERN.

As scientists thrashed out the 'God particle' in its physical form in a giant collider, there was palpable excitement at SINP since its scientists had made significant contributions to the development of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiments at CERN.

The long-sought particle, known as Higgs boson, is also partly named after an Indian scientist Satyendra Nath Bose, who worked with Albert Einstein in the 1920s and made discoveries that led to the most coveted prize in particle physics.

Stating that it was a historical moment in physics and SINP took pride in being a part of the history, the Institute irector Milan Sanyal said "It will require more data and intense scrutiny to establish these findings beyond any doubt.

"This is an important moment for the development of science and I am very happy that our institute, this city and our country is part of the science revolution," he told PTI in Kolkata.

He said that the core CMS team of the SINP had five faculty members — group leader Prof Sunanda Banerjee, Prof Satyaki Bhattacharya, Prof Suchandra Datta, Prof Subir Sarkar and Prof Manoj Saran.

The phrase " God particle" was coined by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Leon Lederman but is used by laymen, not physicists, as an easier way of explaining how the subatomic universe works and got started.

Meanwhile, Cosmologist Archan Majumder, who is attached with the S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, today termed the spotting of the sub-atomic particle "consistent" with the 'God Particle' as a victory for human civilization.

"The discovery is revolutionary in human history. This is a great victory of the fundamental knowledge of human civilization," Majumder told here.

The 'God Particle' of Higgs Boson is regarded as key to understanding the formation of the universe.

"There has been a strong indication of finding the much-awaited new subatomic particle which, though requiring more and more experiments for confirmation in coming years, will go a long way in unravelling the mystery of the evolution of the universe," he said.

Besides scientists from the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, those from Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, Harishchandra Research Institute, Allahabad and Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, were involved in the CERN experiment over the years, he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/God-particle-India-is-like-a-historic-father-of-the-project/articleshow/14678011.cms
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Blwe_torch

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God Particle: Stephen Hawking says he lost $100 bet over Higgs discovery
Agence France-Presse | Updated: July 04, 2012 22:37 IST


"But it is a pity in a way because the great advances in physics have come from experiments that gave results we didn't expect.

"For this reason I had a bet with Gordon Kane of Michigan University that the Higgs particle wouldn't be found. It seems I have just lost $100."

After half a century of research, physicists announced at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) on Wednesday they had found a new sub-atomic particle consistent with the elusive Higgs boson which is believed to confer mass.

Mr Hawking said the discovery was of major importance.

"If the decay and other interactions of this particle are as we expect, it will be strong evidence for the so-called standard model of particle physics, the theory that explains all our experiments so far," Mr Hawking said.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/god-particle-stephen-hawking-says-he-lost-100-bet-over-higgs-discovery-239638
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Blwe_torch

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God's particle for the Dummies......

The Higgs particle - what it is and what it does

 WHAT IS THE HIGGS BOSON?

The Higgs is the last missing piece of the Standard Model, the theory that describes the basic building blocks of the universe. The other 11 particles predicted by the model have been found and finding the Higgs would validate the model. Ruling it out or finding something more exotic would force a rethink on how the universe is put together.

Scientists believe that in the first billionth of a second after the Big Bang, the universe was a gigantic soup of particles racing around at the speed of light without any mass to speak of. It was through their interaction with the Higgs field that they gained mass and eventually formed the universe.

The Higgs field is a theoretical and invisible energy field that pervades the whole cosmos. Some particles, like the photons that make up light, are not affected by it and therefore have no mass. Others are not so lucky and find it drags on them as porridge drags on a spoon.

Picture George Clooney (the particle) walking down a street with a gaggle of photographers (the Higgs field) clustered around him. An average guy on the same street (a photon) gets no attention from the paparazzi and gets on with his day. The Higgs particle is the signature of the field - an eyelash of one of the photographers.

The particle is theoretical, first posited in 1964 by six physicists, including Briton Peter Higgs.

The search for it only began in earnest in the 1980s, first in Fermilab's now mothballed Tevatron particle collider near Chicago and later in a similar machine at CERN, but most intensively since 2010 with the start-up of the European centre's Large Hadron Collider.

WHAT IS THE STANDARD MODEL?

The Standard Model is to physics what the theory of evolution is to biology. It is the best explanation physicists have of how the building blocks of the universe are put together. It describes 12 fundamental particles, governed by four basic forces.

But the universe is a big place and the Standard Model only explains a small part of it. Scientists have spotted a gap between what we can see and what must be out there. That gap must be filled by something we don't fully understand, which they have dubbed 'dark matter'. Galaxies are also hurtling away from each other faster than the forces we know about suggest they should. This gap is filled by 'dark energy'. This poorly understood pair are believed to make up a whopping 96 percent of the mass and energy of the cosmos.

Confirming the Standard Model, or perhaps modifying it, would be a step towards the holy grail of physics - a 'theory of everything' that encompasses dark matter, dark energy and the force of gravity, which the Standard Model also does not explain. It could also shed light on even more esoteric ideas, such as the possibility of parallel universes.

CERN spokesman James Gillies has said that just as Albert Einstein's theories enveloped and built on the work of Isaac Newton, the work being done by the thousands of physicists at CERN has the potential to do the same to Einstein's work.

WHAT IS THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER?

The Large Hadron Collider is the world's biggest and most powerful particle accelerator, a 27-km (17-mile) looped pipe that sits in a tunnel 100 meters underground on the Swiss/French border. It cost 3 billion euros to build.

Two beams of protons are fired in opposite directions around it before smashing into each other to create many millions of particle collisions every second in a recreation of the conditions a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, when the Higgs field is believed to have 'switched on'.

The vast amount of data produced is examined by banks of computers. Of all the trillions of collisions, very few are just right for revealing the Higgs particle. That makes the hunt for the Higgs slow, and progress incremental.

WHAT IS THE THRESHOLD FOR PROOF?

To claim a discovery, scientists have set themselves a target for certainty that they call "5 sigma". This means that there is a probability of less than one in a million that their conclusions from the data harvested from the particle accelerator are the result of a statistical fluke.

The two teams hunting for the Higgs at CERN, called Atlas and CMS, now have twice the amount of data that allowed them to claim 'tantalizing glimpses' of the Higgs at the end of last year and this could push their results beyond that threshold.

(Editing by Kevin Liffey)
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feverpitch

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The CERN have just announced the discovery of God particle........after holding on to the announcement for a couple of months....(courtesy Reuter)


In particle physics, bosons are one of the two fundamental classes of subatomic particles, the other being fermions.
Bosons are characterized by their obedience to Bose–Einstein statistics. This class of particles includes photons and gluons, as well as the hypothetical Higgs boson. The name boson is derived from the surname of the Indian physicist, Satyendra Nath Bose, a contemporary of the German physicist  :love7:.

It should have been named the Ganguly particle.

I vote for rasam and mundu particle.
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