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Blwe_torch

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Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« on: December 19, 2011, 02:55:26 PM »

Happy that kids are playing football in India: Mueller
PTI | Dec 19, 2011, 07.59PM IST


NEW DELHI: Winner of the 'Golden Boot' at the 2010 Wold Cup, star Bayern Munich and German footballer Thomas Mueller has urged youngsters in India to take up the sport ahead of the club's upcoming trip to the country.

"Football is the best team sport in the world, (I'm) happy that more and more kids are playing the game in India," said Mueller, who will be leading a bevy of stars when Bayern play the Indian national team in Bhaichung Bhutia's farewell match on January 10.

This will be Mueller's second trip to the country. "I am happy to come back after the visit to Kolkata and Siliguri in January 2009," the attacking midfielder, who was also voted the 'Best Young Player' at the last World Cup in South Africa, said.

Mueller's team-mate at Bayern, striker Mario Gomez said that the entire team was looking forward to the trip, organised by Audi. "The trip to India will be a big experience for us, as most of us have not been to India," Gomez, who had joined the German champion for a record transfer fee, said.

Two-time 'European Footballer of the Year', German legend Karl-Heinz Rummenigge, who enjoyed great success with Bayern, said the club was happy to be sending its first team.

"I have heard about the great experiences from our players and coaches when they travelled for (former captain and goalkeeper) Oliver Kahn's farewell match. We are now delighted to bring the full first team to India.

"Many of us are excited about the country, the city of Delhi, the people and their enthusiasm for football," said Rummenigge, who is currently the CEO at Bayern.

Coach Josef Jupp Heynckes said they would be looking to present themselves in the best possible manner.

"We will want to show quality football and want to present ourselves in the best possible manner. Naturally, I would like to utilise the opportunity to learn more about Indian football," said Heynckes, who was part of the German squad that won the World Cup and the European Championship in the early 1970s.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/football/top-stories/Happy-that-kids-are-playing-football-in-India-Mueller/articleshow/11170126.cms
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2012, 04:33:27 AM »

Hi..happy to listen that kids in india playing football...but any reason why india not able to make entry in world cup...
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2012, 02:57:50 PM »

Hi..happy to listen that kids in india playing football...but any reason why india not able to make entry in world cup...

Indians are physically not upto it.
Football needs besides good skills, an athletic build and good speed and stamina............Indians are still doing the catching up job with the rest of the world in this area. May be in the next 50 years Indians shall hopefully come up :icon_thumleft:
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2012, 07:33:55 AM »

Hi..happy to listen that kids in india playing football...but any reason why india not able to make entry in world cup...

Indians are physically not upto it.
Football needs besides good skills, an athletic build and good speed and stamina............Indians are still doing the catching up job with the rest of the world in this area. May be in the next 50 years Indians shall hopefully come up :icon_thumleft:

Except for Seydou Keita and Gerard Pique, I can't think of any Barcelona player who have bigger physique than the average Indian player these days. Better—yes. For their training, conditioning and medical support structure is light years ahead. Most importantly, they have open minds ready to accept the same. Forget Barca, Argentina and Spain, what about the Koreas and Japan? Are they physically bigger? In fact, let's just start low—why aren't we able to even compete with Malayasia, Thailand and Indonesia—they don't even qualify for the Asia Cup, but would beat us hollow on most days?

The problem(s) are manifold, in my opinion, and run deep. Whether it is the administrators at the top, the clubs in the middle, or the coaching at the bottom—the whole system is rotten. Our entire football infrastructure lives in a time warp.

Take the once-nerve centre of football in India—Kolkata—for instance. Clubs and their coaches and administrators are happy if Mohun Bagan beats East Bengal or vice-versa. People said that when international soccer is televised here, things will improve. Well, all that has happened is that it has moved spectators away, and rightfully. Neither coaches, nor administrators follow the trends, nor do they understand the analysis that is proffered of the same on live TV, or in newspaper articles, books and scholarly work op the same. They are not even interested. They don't know English, and so can't even follow what is being said.

Try telling the Bangla commentator (Manas Bhattacharya, for example), or the Bengali coaches Bhombol (Subhash Bhowmik) or Bablu (Subrata Bhattacharya), that the concept of full back has been eclipsed by wing backs, globally, sometimes in the mid-fifties, with Bela Guttmann and Vicente Feola, and see the look of boredom on their faces. That will tell you the whole story.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2012, 08:18:31 AM »

Hi..happy to listen that kids in india playing football...but any reason why india not able to make entry in world cup...

Indians are physically not upto it.
Football needs besides good skills, an athletic build and good speed and stamina............Indians are still doing the catching up job with the rest of the world in this area. May be in the next 50 years Indians shall hopefully come up :icon_thumleft:

Except for Seydou Keita and Gerard Pique, I can't think of any Barcelona player who have bigger physique than the average Indian player these days. Better—yes. For their training, conditioning and medical support structure is light years ahead. Most importantly, they have open minds ready to accept the same. Forget Barca, Argentina and Spain, what about the Koreas and Japan? Are they physically bigger? In fact, let's just start low—why aren't we able to even compete with Malayasia, Thailand and Indonesia—they don't even qualify for the Asia Cup, but would beat us hollow on most days?

The problem(s) are manifold, in my opinion, and run deep. Whether it is the administrators at the top, the clubs in the middle, or the coaching at the bottom—the whole system is rotten. Our entire football infrastructure lives in a time warp.

Take the once-nerve centre of football in India—Kolkata—for instance. Clubs and their coaches and administrators are happy if Mohun Bagan beats East Bengal or vice-versa. People said that when international soccer is televised here, things will improve. Well, all that has happened is that it has moved spectators away, and rightfully. Neither coaches, nor administrators follow the trends, nor do they understand the analysis that is proffered of the same on live TV, or in newspaper articles, books and scholarly work op the same. They are not even interested. They don't know English, and so can't even follow what is being said.

Try telling the Bangla commentator (Manas Bhattacharya, for example), or the Bengali coaches Bhombol (Subhash Bhowmik) or Bablu (Subrata Bhattacharya), that the concept of full back has been eclipsed by wing backs, globally, sometimes in the mid-fifties, with Bela Guttmann and Vicente Feola, and see the look of boredom on their faces. That will tell you the whole story.

I agree that we do not have good coaches or administrators in our local clubs.........that is another part of  the problem. If the game improves, may be, we shall have the best of coaches and managers totting our grounds( just as in IPL, for whatever reasons).
But the physique/ stamina question remains.
I am not talking about 'big' physique as such.................big guys, yet athletic and fast are required for the defensive positions( forget Sudhir Karmakar of the yore or even the talented Hanumant Singh of the Indian basketball team).
Our guys are lagging behind the South-east Asian guys, as of now...and certainly behind the Japs and Koreans, for quite sometimes.
Fitness, athleticism, speed, stamina and skill are the basic ingredients of modern football.

I was in the Salt Lake stadium, when East Bengal faced Bochum of Germany....with 1982 world-cupper Fischer in the team. We had Krishanu Dey......starting off with his silken ball-skills.....that send the entire 1.5 lakhs spectators to a frenzy. But it was too good to last.............and it didn't even last beyond a minute, ...............by the time he was all bottled up by the faster and stronger, but apparently 'average' Germans....and Krishanu Dey was no more to be 'seen' on the field. The only EB..or rather the Indian player who made his presence felt was goal-keeper Bhashkar Ganguly.........................had it not been for his brilliant saves, it would have been easily 16-0 and not 6-0.

Again, the same venue...this time with the Japs........Nissan vs EB( 1992-93). ................and this was the time when the Japs were not the all-conquering Asian team, that they are now. They were very unknown and EB and the fans fancied their chances against them. We also had 3 talented Englishmen on our side...big bodies and all.
From the distance of the galleries, the Japs appeared like young school-boys as against the apparently heftier EB players.............but these Japs were like the Bengali Koi-fish...........absolutely irrepressible.........................the EB players were toyed around like a bunch of country-ameteurs...by these professional and precise Japs............................and in no time, the score-line was 3-0.
Now that is called real fitness, speed and whatever is required.
The Japs gave us the hint of what is to come...............and now you see, they are a top-notch international team...and their ladies are the World Champions................absolutely, sleek, professional...and precise. I wish, the Indians become like that, one day.

That match ended 3-1......East Bengal did better in the 2nd half...and they were at the time the best Indian club team.............one of the Englishmen scored a diving header, at the fag end...to make it 3-1.................and we all celebrated that, as if we won the WC! :) :)

First lets have the basics right...everything else may follow.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2012, 09:15:09 AM »

Hi..happy to listen that kids in india playing football...but any reason why india not able to make entry in world cup...

Indians are physically not upto it.
Football needs besides good skills, an athletic build and good speed and stamina............Indians are still doing the catching up job with the rest of the world in this area. May be in the next 50 years Indians shall hopefully come up :icon_thumleft:

Except for Seydou Keita and Gerard Pique, I can't think of any Barcelona player who have bigger physique than the average Indian player these days. Better—yes. For their training, conditioning and medical support structure is light years ahead. Most importantly, they have open minds ready to accept the same. Forget Barca, Argentina and Spain, what about the Koreas and Japan? Are they physically bigger? In fact, let's just start low—why aren't we able to even compete with Malayasia, Thailand and Indonesia—they don't even qualify for the Asia Cup, but would beat us hollow on most days?

The problem(s) are manifold, in my opinion, and run deep. Whether it is the administrators at the top, the clubs in the middle, or the coaching at the bottom—the whole system is rotten. Our entire football infrastructure lives in a time warp.

Take the once-nerve centre of football in India—Kolkata—for instance. Clubs and their coaches and administrators are happy if Mohun Bagan beats East Bengal or vice-versa. People said that when international soccer is televised here, things will improve. Well, all that has happened is that it has moved spectators away, and rightfully. Neither coaches, nor administrators follow the trends, nor do they understand the analysis that is proffered of the same on live TV, or in newspaper articles, books and scholarly work op the same. They are not even interested. They don't know English, and so can't even follow what is being said.

Try telling the Bangla commentator (Manas Bhattacharya, for example), or the Bengali coaches Bhombol (Subhash Bhowmik) or Bablu (Subrata Bhattacharya), that the concept of full back has been eclipsed by wing backs, globally, sometimes in the mid-fifties, with Bela Guttmann and Vicente Feola, and see the look of boredom on their faces. That will tell you the whole story.

I agree that we do not have good coaches or administrators in our local clubs.........that is another part of  the problem. If the game improves, may be, we shall have the best of coaches and managers totting our grounds (just as in IPL, for whatever reasons). But the physique/ stamina question remains. I am not talking about 'big' physique as such.................big guys, yet athletic and fast are required for the defensive positions( forget Sudhir Karmakar of the yore or even the talented Hanumant Singh of the Indian basketball team).

I disagree. We have to uproot the entire system and build everythin from bottom up, to succeed. The Japanese did this when they started the J-League. Maybe PLS will be that impetus—who knows.

Indian groups/communities who are interested in football are genetically predisposed to being short. But stamina, upto a point, can be built with proper focus and training. Where does that happen?

Our guys are lagging behind the South-east Asian guys, as of now...and certainly behind the Japs and Koreans, for quite sometimes. Fitness, athleticism, speed, stamina and skill are the basic ingredients of modern football. I was in the Salt Lake stadium, when East Bengal faced Bochum of Germany....with 1982 world-cupper Fischer in the team. We had Krishanu Dey......starting off with his silken ball-skills.....that send the entire 1.5 lakhs spectators to a frenzy. But it was too good to last.............and it didn't even last beyond a minute, ...............by the time he was all bottled up by the faster and stronger, but apparently 'average' Germans....and Krishanu Dey was no more to be 'seen' on the field. The only EB..or rather the Indian player who made his presence felt was goal-keeper Bhashkar Ganguly.........................had it not been for his brilliant saves, it would have been easily 16-0 and not 6-0.

In other words, Krishanu had the distribution skills to bypass the bigger bodied Germans, but not the dribbling skills. Of course we all know he neither had the stamina nor the mental or physical strength. But the even dribbling skills he had that wowed Indian spectators were not enough. After all, the world has seen, even in the modern game, players like Riquelme and Ganso, who are great dribblers and distributors without physical strength, speed or stamina playing at the top.

Basically, we can't be satisfied with the well we live in, in order to improve. I have seen several players on the streets of Kolkata and its suburbs who could keep dribbling around till the cows came home. On a small, 5-a-side field, they looked better than Ronaldinho. But it was not only their physical attributes that prevented them from graduating higher—it was footballing intelligence. The reason why Denilson was the world's most expensive flop of his time is the same.

But this intelligence can only grow with proper mind-body training—of the kind the La Masia Cantera offers in Barcelona. Here they drill the intelligent responses into the minds of the players so well, that by the time the player emerges to play in the first team, they automatically process information about, say, the three forward passing options, two dribbling options, one back-passing option and two lateral passing options that one may have at a particular time—first noticing them, and then deciding which one is the best FOR THE TEAM rather than themselves (and the gallery), and execute it, almost as if it is a programmed reaction, in a split second. For more, read Xavi Hernandez's interview in the Guardian.

THIS. IS. SPARTA.

Err, this is modern football. And this is what no one involved in the game in India knows, far less understand.

Again, the same venue...this time with the Japs........Nissan vs EB (1992-93). And this was the time when the Japs were not the all-conquering Asian team, that they are now. They were very unknown and EB and the fans fancied their chances against them. We also had 3 talented Englishmen on our side...big bodies and all. From the distance of the galleries, the Japs appeared like young school-boys as against the apparently heftier EB players.............but these Japs were like the Bengali Koi-fish...........absolutely irrepressible.........................the EB players were toyed around like a bunch of country-ameteurs...by these professional and precise Japs............................and in no time, the score-line was 3-0.

The year 1992 is significant, because it was around then that the J League started.

But are you talking of Nissan, or Abahani Krira Chakra (Bangladesh) and al Fanja (Qatar)? If it's the latter, I was there too. Though not as an EB fan, just as a fan of football. The Englishmen were probably Prindville, Neville and John Devine, 2nd div English players in their late 30's.

Now that is called real fitness, speed and whatever is required.
The Japs gave us the hint of what is to come...............and now you see, they are a top-notch international team...and their ladies are the World Champions................absolutely, sleek, professional...and precise. I wish, the Indians become like that, one day.
That match ended 3-1......East Bengal did better in the 2nd half...and they were at the time the best Indian club team.............one of the Englishmen scored a diving header, at the fag end...to make it 3-1.................and we all celebrated that, as if we won the WC! :) :)

Soon after, India lost to Japan in a WC qualifier (those days, we used to be in the 1st round of the quals, nowadays, we're not even there), I think, 6-0 or 7-0. But that Japan, as you said, was no comparison to the current one. These days, even Asian teams in the WC show admirable tactical knowledge. In fact, with a little more killer instinct, the Japs and South Koreans could have gone further in the last WC in S Africa.

But where do we see such tactical acumen? Where do we see the skill? These can be nurtured without having to depend on nature.

First lets have the basics right...everything else may follow.

Yeah, right!
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2012, 09:43:15 AM »

That was against the Nissan.............the english players were Neil Edmunds( scorer), Steve Prindeville......and the other guy's name, I am forgetting.......Neville something, as you have mentioned.

The Abahoni match was in 1991 November, I think........................................the same day South Africa played their first international ODI in Eden Gardens, after 30 odd years. I missed the Abahoni match...but fortunately saw the South Africa match live.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2012, 09:44:59 AM »

Something I wrote for the New Indian Express (but can't find the link now), which might be contextually interesting and related:



On Saturday, October 8, 2011, the football team of South Africa faltered comically and failed to qualify for the African Cup of Nations (ACN). The reason—the South African-born coach of the Bafana Bafana, Pitso Mosimane, was apparently unaware of the finer details of the qualification rules. In case you missed it, the South Africans went into their final qualifier against Sierra Leone level on eight points with their opponents and a point behind Niger, who were playing Egypt at the same time.

An hour into the game in Nelspruit, the score was 0-0, while Niger were down 3-0 in Cairo. That meant three teams—South Africa, Sierra Leone and Niger—were level on nine points. South Africa had the best goal difference, but, what their coach had missed was that their head-to-head records, and not goal difference, is what matters these days under FIFA qualification rules. On that count, Niger led by a point (they had six points against South Africa and Sierra Leone, while the Bafana had five against Sierra Leone and Niger). South Africa needed a goal to win, move up to 11 points, and qualify undisputed. Confident of his understanding of the rules, Mosimane decided to play safe, and held back star striker Lehlohonolo Majoro on the bench. They got the draw they wanted, and celebrated their 'qualification' on the pitch. Then, reality dawned on them. Mosimane admitted he had been at fault, while the South African Football Association wrote to the Confederation of African Football challenging the rules.

As the world media poured in, it became immediately apparent what they were after. Why would the ACN suddenly necessitate such coverage, when none was given earlier? Why, but the smug fulfilment of the deep-seated colonial hangover, of white man's obligation to rule over and encourage development of people from other ethnic and cultural backgrounds. In plainspeak, people of colour being the 'missing link', it's for their benefit that they should not be allowed anywhere close to positions of power, or those that require higher (read logical) faculties. It is the reason why you'd be hardpressed to find a black coach in US basketball, a sport dominated for ages by African-Americans on the court, or in European football, despite club and national teams filled with players of African descent. Or why African national football associations plump for unknown or out-of-work European coaches just before marquee events like the ACN or the FIFA World Cup, ditching successful local coaches who may even have led their sides through the qualifiers.

But does the argument—that the black man should be allowed to play because of his palpable physical advantages, but not allowed to coach, because nature hasn't been kind enough in endowing 'Sambo' above the shoulders—have muscle? What about Shaun Pollock, then captain of the Proteas, in the 2003 cricket World Cup, who erred on Duckworth-Lewis, counting one less run for the ball, that resulted in the Proteas getting eliminated in the first round, in their own country? And just in case you'd think a white man, born-and-brought up in warm climes, goes soft between the ears, what about Michael Vaughan, who became the second Englishman after Graham Gooch to be given out handled the ball in Tests: in 2001, in a test match against India in Bangalore, on 64, he brushed away a ball from Sarandeep Singh, and was given out on appeal.

The Indian subcontinent has thrown up its fair share of headless-chickens in the sporting arena, with generations of wooly-headed Indian cricketers and captains adding to the overall image of a 'soft' sporting nation. In fact, the reason why Sourav Ganguly's bare-chested act at Lords left so many panjandrums of India's cricketing hierarchy frothing in the mouth, is most likely because it sharply contrasted with their own meek surrenders in the face of bullying, for decades. But would this then mean that cockiness, cunning and streetsmartness is antithetical to sub-continental sporting traditions? The likes of Imran Khan and Javed Miandad would certainly disagree, even though in recent years, the Pakistan cricket team has indeed lost some of their edgy gamesmanship. Maybe, their team has lost its collective memory and nous in the haze of match-fixing and the death of cricket-nationalism. Maybe, the relative lack of education in the new-gen Pakistani cricketer, a far cry from the time when an Oxbridge education was the qualifying norm to captain the side, is to blame. But then, what is the correlation between street-smartness and formal education?

In 2006, the genial giant of Pakistani cricket, Inzamam ul-Haq, then captaining the side in a test series in England, refused to re-enter the field after tea at the Oval after allegations of ball tampering from umpires Darrell Hair and Billy Doctrove. The umpires had awarded England five penalty runs and the choice to replace the ball, after ruling that Pakistan had illegally altered the ball. Inzamam and his team decided to protest, and sulked inside their dressing room. The umpires, having tried to persuade Inzy to come out, decided that the match could not continue. Later, Inzamam returned to the field with his team, only to find both the umpires and the English team to have already left! Inzy had just become the first captain in history to forfeit a Test match. And he wasn't even aware of his 'achievement', clearly because of his lack of understanding of the rules of the gentleman's game. Can one imagine this happening under Salim Malik or Wasim Akram's watch?

This wasn't the first time in the new millenium that a Pakistan team member had ended up with egg on his face. Inzy himself has been one of the biggest culprits. From blocking a fielder's return throw with his bat while short of the crease, to missing a sweep against Monty Panesar, losing balance and collapsing on to his stumps, to being run out in every possible comical fashion, he was a walking disaster mitigated by his genuinely bumbling character and sublime batting skills.
 
Even in the infamous 'monkeygate' scandal involving the Indian and Australian cricket teams in the summer of 2007, whatever be the actual sequence of events, barring Sachin's 'Yudhisthir act', what the Indian team displayed was that they were ready to give it back to the Australians in their own coin, much to the consternation of the Kangaroos who were, till then, used to steamrolling visiting teams, particularly Indians, by their 'creative gamesmanship' and mental disintegration techniques.

It is clear then, that gumption, logical faculties and cunning among sportspersons is not necessarily a racial characteristic and preserve of 'more evolved' humans. However, they are essential components in all modern sports, and involves not only a comprehension of the intricacies of the laws that govern the particular sport, but also the ability to understand their limits, and the cunning to stretch the boundaries, much like the sledging by Australian cricketers. And, crucially, it presupposes knowledge about the history of the game, particularly the precedents of anomaly that indicate they direction in which the laws can be stretched without breaking them. Veeru, Yuvi and Dhoni be warned—there is nothing to be gained, and much to be lost—in their proudly professed lack of interest in the history of the game.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2012, 09:48:07 AM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2012, 09:50:02 AM »

That was against the Nissan.............the english players were Neil Edmunds( scorer), Steve Prindeville......and the other guy's name, I am forgetting.......Neville something, as you have mentioned.

The Abahoni match was in 1991 November, I think........................................the same day South Africa played their first international ODI in Eden Gardens, after 30 odd years. I missed the Abahoni match...but fortunately saw the South Africa match live.

Oh yeah. The Abahoni match was on the day the Saffies arrived to the Taj Bengal (Indians stayed in the Oberoi Grand). I was there for both matches, scurrying from Salt Lake Stadium to the Great Eastern hotel to attend the post-match reception, then to Oberoi to meet the Injuns (Ravi Shastri and Vengsarkar were already drunk silly while they entered the hotel), and THEN to the Taj Bengal to get autographs and fotos with the Saffies. And the Eden the next day, to watch India almost losing, with Donald taking a 5fer and scaring the bejesus of our top order.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2012, 09:55:05 AM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.

That PSV was the best club side (in their prime) to visit India till then, I believe. They were the reigning Euro Cup champs then, and had Guus Hiddink as coach. Even without Romario, they had Kalusha Bwalya, the De Boers (then babies), Ronald Koeman, Eric Gerets, Sřren Lerby, Wim Kieft, and Hans van Breukelen. What a team!

But didn't Okorie Cheema get red carded in the match, and Kuljeet score one with his trademark ass-flick :evil4:?
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2012, 09:59:29 AM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.

That PSV was the best club side (in their prime) to visit India till then, I believe. They were the reigning Euro Cup champs then, and had Guus Hiddink as coach. Even without Romario, they had Kalusha Bwalya, the De Boers (then babies), Ronald Koeman, Eric Gerets, Sřren Lerby, Wim Kieft, and Hans van Breukelen. What a team!

But didn't Okorie Cheema get red carded in the match, and Kuljeet score one with his trademark ass-flick :evil4:?


I think Cheema got the red card against an Uruguayan team......may be in the Nehru Cup..............and Kuljeet didn't score in that match, as far as I remember..it was 8-0
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2012, 10:08:59 AM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.

That PSV was the best club side (in their prime) to visit India till then, I believe. They were the reigning Euro Cup champs then, and had Guus Hiddink as coach. Even without Romario, they had Kalusha Bwalya, the De Boers (then babies), Ronald Koeman, Eric Gerets, Sřren Lerby, Wim Kieft, and Hans van Breukelen. What a team!

But didn't Okorie Cheema get red carded in the match, and Kuljeet score one with his trademark ass-flick :evil4:?


I think Cheema got the red card against an Uruguayan team......may be in the Nehru Cup..............and Kuljeet didn't score in that match, as far as I remember..it was 8-0

You might be right with Kuljeet, but since it was a match against IFA XI, some Nigerian played and immediately got red carded. Somehow it seems to have been Cheema to me. Or was it Christo (Christopher Kem)?

It couldn't have been ChibuJoker—he was too tiny to tackle the Dutch?

This reminds me—Christo was the equivalent of Bob Christo in the footballing arena. Remember how he missed the goal for Md Sporting against Lyngby in the Nehru Cup, after being set up on a platter by Emeka Ezeugo? He did a Junior Baiano, 10 years before Baiano had gained notoreity in the 1998 WC. Insteda of shooting into the open net, he turned round and tried to pass the ball to someone else. ;D
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2012, 10:16:47 AM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.

That PSV was the best club side (in their prime) to visit India till then, I believe. They were the reigning Euro Cup champs then, and had Guus Hiddink as coach. Even without Romario, they had Kalusha Bwalya, the De Boers (then babies), Ronald Koeman, Eric Gerets, Sřren Lerby, Wim Kieft, and Hans van Breukelen. What a team!

But didn't Okorie Cheema get red carded in the match, and Kuljeet score one with his trademark ass-flick :evil4:?


I think Cheema got the red card against an Uruguayan team......may be in the Nehru Cup..............and Kuljeet didn't score in that match, as far as I remember..it was 8-0

You might be right with Kuljeet, but since it was a match against IFA XI, some Nigerian played and immediately got red carded. Somehow it seems to have been Cheema to me. Or was it Christo (Christopher Kem)?

It couldn't have been ChibuJoker—he was too tiny to tackle the Dutch?

This reminds me—Christo was the equivalent of Bob Christo in the footballing arena. Remember how he missed the goal for Md Sporting against Lyngby in the Nehru Cup, after being set up on a platter by Emeka Ezeugo? He did a Junior Baiano, 10 years before Baiano had gained notoreity in the 1998 WC. Insteda of shooting into the open net, he turned round and tried to pass the ball to someone else. ;D

Yes...I remember that.................btw, I remember Emeka since the days, he used to play inter-university football back in Chandigarh( late 80s)..............and in the next 10 years, he rose through the levels and represented Nigeria in WC..............some pride is due, to those dry fields of Punjab, where he came up as a footballer. :icon_thumleft:
These Africans have some stamina and speed...........it was really tough for us playing 90 mins against a bunch of them( first hand experience)...and one's confidence takes a beating! :D
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2012, 10:42:52 AM »

Near perfect Body-wise, the best Indians I have seen are ofcourse Manoranjan Bhattacharya and Baichung Bhutia. These guys according to me, possessed the right balance required for international level.
IM Vijayan too comes quite close...but on the 2nd rung.
I haven't seen the likes of Sunil Chhetri...or the recent players, though.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2012, 10:57:48 AM »

That was against the Nissan.............the english players were Neil Edmunds( scorer), Steve Prindeville......and the other guy's name, I am forgetting.......Neville something, as you have mentioned.

The Abahoni match was in 1991 November, I think........................................the same day South Africa played their first international ODI in Eden Gardens, after 30 odd years. I missed the Abahoni match...but fortunately saw the South Africa match live.

Oh yeah. The Abahoni match was on the day the Saffies arrived to the Taj Bengal (Indians stayed in the Oberoi Grand). I was there for both matches, scurrying from Salt Lake Stadium to the Great Eastern hotel to attend the post-match reception, then to Oberoi to meet the Injuns (Ravi Shastri and Vengsarkar were already drunk silly while they entered the hotel), and THEN to the Taj Bengal to get autographs and fotos with the Saffies. And the Eden the next day, to watch India almost losing, with Donald taking a 5fer and scaring the bejesus of our top order.


Donald had bowled one of his best spells that day..........and Eden Garden got the taste of real fast bowling( do you remember the collective whooooooooooooooooooooo....when Donald bowled his first ball to Ravi Shastri? :)
The surprise factor also worked in his favour.
We barely got through ..thanks to Sachin's skills and Amre's doggedness. :)
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2012, 11:50:50 AM »

Near perfect Body-wise, the best Indians I have seen are ofcourse Manoranjan Bhattacharya and Baichung Bhutia. These guys according to me, possessed the right balance required for international level.
IM Vijayan too comes quite close...but on the 2nd rung.
I haven't seen the likes of Sunil Chhetri...or the recent players, though.

Bhaichung and Vijayan I'd put on the same level.

Mona... Bohohoho... that guy wasn't even a footballer. And a stock body doesn't make a footballer, imho. Even Tarun had better skill and build. Mona belonged to maximum security Leavenworth-type prison. He wasn't even Pepe, to draw a modern analogy—more like Andoni Goikoetxea, the butcher of Bilbao. And I once even remember him doing a Junior Baiano before Christo. The myth about his bravery is just that—urban legend. If you know you can go studs up into the midriff of your opponent day in and day out and get away with it—why, I'd be the greatest defender on the planet.

That way, '80's onwards, Gautam Sarkar, and then Sudeep Chatterjee had the best physique and game to match international standards. Even Ćirić Milovan said so about Sudeep when he coached India. His career was however finished by P K Bannerjee and Jota Shib (Pradeep Talukdar) in the IFA Shield final in 1988, just after he led India to SAF gold. Sadly, he passed away some years ago from dementia.

Of course, Parmar and Parminder of JCT were also well-built, but they had the intelligence of a Cover Point (Understandable, they come from similar stock).  ::Whip:: :evil4:

After that, Joe-Paul Ancherry, I'd say, had similar physique and good skill, but was wasted by injury.

Among today's players (and I haven't followed a lot recently), Robin Singh (now EB) seems to have good build with decent skill. Chhetri is far too small, but has decent fitness and skill.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2012, 11:57:13 AM »

That was against the Nissan.............the english players were Neil Edmunds( scorer), Steve Prindeville......and the other guy's name, I am forgetting.......Neville something, as you have mentioned.

The Abahoni match was in 1991 November, I think........................................the same day South Africa played their first international ODI in Eden Gardens, after 30 odd years. I missed the Abahoni match...but fortunately saw the South Africa match live.

Oh yeah. The Abahoni match was on the day the Saffies arrived to the Taj Bengal (Indians stayed in the Oberoi Grand). I was there for both matches, scurrying from Salt Lake Stadium to the Great Eastern hotel to attend the post-match reception, then to Oberoi to meet the Injuns (Ravi Shastri and Vengsarkar were already drunk silly while they entered the hotel), and THEN to the Taj Bengal to get autographs and fotos with the Saffies. And the Eden the next day, to watch India almost losing, with Donald taking a 5fer and scaring the bejesus of our top order.


Donald had bowled one of his best spells that day..........and Eden Garden got the taste of real fast bowling( do you remember the collective whooooooooooooooooooooo....when Donald bowled his first ball to Ravi Shastri? :)
The surprise factor also worked in his favour.
We barely got through ..thanks to Sachin's skills and Amre's doggedness. :)

I must say while he seemed frightening when accurate, I was not overtly impressed in that first showing. He seemed too indisciplined and sprayed the ball all over far too many times to maintain pressure. But when he got the ball on target, boy, did he make the likes of Shastri smell leather!

In fact, that day alone, I felt Donald was more like a Patrick Patterson. I got the same feeling when Waqur played against India first, and took a fifer. On both occasions (minus the Windian), they sacrificed accuracy for pace. Both of course changed after that.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2012, 12:04:55 PM »

I remember, Krishanu did the same against PSV Eindhoven too.............just for a while........and the then Manager of PSV..Bobby Robson lamented......how Romario would have enjoyed playing here( Kolkata).............this was the match which Romario missed..although PSV scored an 8-0 victory.

That PSV was the best club side (in their prime) to visit India till then, I believe. They were the reigning Euro Cup champs then, and had Guus Hiddink as coach. Even without Romario, they had Kalusha Bwalya, the De Boers (then babies), Ronald Koeman, Eric Gerets, Sřren Lerby, Wim Kieft, and Hans van Breukelen. What a team!

But didn't Okorie Cheema get red carded in the match, and Kuljeet score one with his trademark ass-flick :evil4:?


I think Cheema got the red card against an Uruguayan team......may be in the Nehru Cup..............and Kuljeet didn't score in that match, as far as I remember..it was 8-0

You might be right with Kuljeet, but since it was a match against IFA XI, some Nigerian played and immediately got red carded. Somehow it seems to have been Cheema to me. Or was it Christo (Christopher Kem)?

It couldn't have been ChibuJoker—he was too tiny to tackle the Dutch?

This reminds me—Christo was the equivalent of Bob Christo in the footballing arena. Remember how he missed the goal for Md Sporting against Lyngby in the Nehru Cup, after being set up on a platter by Emeka Ezeugo? He did a Junior Baiano, 10 years before Baiano had gained notoreity in the 1998 WC. Insteda of shooting into the open net, he turned round and tried to pass the ball to someone else. ;D

Yes...I remember that.................btw, I remember Emeka since the days, he used to play inter-university football back in Chandigarh( late 80s)..............and in the next 10 years, he rose through the levels and represented Nigeria in WC..............some pride is due, to those dry fields of Punjab, where he came up as a footballer. :icon_thumleft:
These Africans have some stamina and speed...........it was really tough for us playing 90 mins against a bunch of them( first hand experience)...and one's confidence takes a beating! :D

Well, Emeka was a real aberration. Just for that tournament, he had returned to India and Md Sporting from some club in Malayasia, after having left India two years ago without making a scratch. This time however, he was transformed into a box-to-box midfield general, who played a lone hand against Lyngby of Denmark and Olympia of Paraguay, and so impressed the Europeans that was immediately signed to go to Scandinavia with them. Though not a Md Sporting supporter, I have fond memories of them in that Nehru Cup, solely because of Emeka's barnstorming performance, and rejoiced when he came in as substitute for (I think) Finidi George in that sapping pre-quarter-final against Italy in the 1994 US World Cup.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2012, 12:23:58 PM »

Actually, this thread requires colonel's participation to complete the nostalgic wallow.

paging colonel...

Speaking of Parmar and Parminder, I remember a story he once told me, quoting Surajeet Sengupta's autobiography. Apparently, before a Santosh Trophy final between Punjab and West Bengal, Surajeet, knowing that either of the Punjab defenders would love to 'break a leg', told Parminder in the hotel that there was going to be rain during the match, which is why he, Surajeet, was planning to wear long-stud boots. Hearing him, the entire Punjab team carried only long-stud boots to the dry, sandy, Ambedkar Stadium, New Delhi, in the middle of summer. By the end of the first half, the Punjab team was down, ragged, with self-inflicted injuries from the studded boots, and Surajeet and Prasoon had put Bengal ahead. In the half-time, they fetched normal boots from the hotel and throughout the rest of the match, Parminder chased Surajeet with wild intent in his eyes, but by that time, the match had already been sewn up by Bengal. :icon_jokercolor:
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2012, 03:59:03 PM »

Surojeet Sengupta was a genius footballer. Initially he played for Mohunbagan...but later shifted to EB.
I remember seeing my first MB vs EB match...that too a final..IFA Shield final in 1975.....
i was barely 6 yrs old then............................Surojeet scored the first of the 5 goals.............................the match was being played at the Mohunbagan ground............i was being accompanied by an uncle, who happened to be an MB supporter and club member.
After the 2nd goal( Shyam Thapa from a Subhash Bhowmick pass), he thought it was enough...and rushed out with me, saying that there will be trouble...and that we should get back home quickly. :)

I remember seeing my fav goalkeeper Tarun Basu effecting some very nice saves.......although, he wasn't under any pressure at all. All the pressure was there on the opponent goalkeeper...an young Bhashkar Ganguly...who had a terrible match...and had to leave the field crying. He went on to become one of India's best goalkeepers till date, later on...but that's another story..
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 04:01:56 PM by Blwe_torch »
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2012, 06:59:04 AM »

Surojeet Sengupta was a genius footballer. Initially he played for Mohunbagan...but later shifted to EB.
I remember seeing my first MB vs EB match...that too a final..IFA Shield final in 1975.....
i was barely 6 yrs old then............................Surojeet scored the first of the 5 goals.............................the match was being played at the Mohunbagan ground............i was being accompanied by an uncle, who happened to be an MB supporter and club member.
After the 2nd goal( Shyam Thapa from a Subhash Bhowmick pass), he thought it was enough...and rushed out with me, saying that there will be trouble...and that we should get back home quickly. :)

I remember seeing my fav goalkeeper Tarun Basu effecting some very nice saves.......although, he wasn't under any pressure at all. All the pressure was there on the opponent goalkeeper...an young Bhashkar Ganguly...who had a terrible match...and had to leave the field crying. He went on to become one of India's best goalkeepers till date, later on...but that's another story..

Surojeet was a brilliant footballer. He still is a great human being, and one of the few highly erudite and adept commentators, someone who can actually explain what was happening on the field of play, and what one should do or not do, in words that are logical, sharp, humble and eloquent. A dying breed today.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2012, 09:50:51 PM »

Terrible and misleading title.

Should say that happy that kids are playing SOCCER in India.

I got excited that India has started playing the real sport for a change and maybe Tebow may actually find a real team now (if Jesus is by him)
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2012, 05:54:17 AM »

Terrible and misleading title.

Should say that happy that kids are playing SOCCER in India.

I got excited that India has started playing the real sport for a change and maybe Tebow may actually find a real team now (if Jesus is by him)

who the f**k is tebow...and what has Jesus got to do with it?! :evil4:
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2012, 02:07:45 PM »

Terrible and misleading title.

Should say that happy that kids are playing SOCCER in India.

I got excited that India has started playing the real sport for a change and maybe Tebow may actually find a real team now (if Jesus is by him)

who the f**k is tebow...and what has Jesus got to do with it?! :evil4:

He is Jesus Christ. And Sri Krishna oiled into one. Go to a website called google.com. The. You will see a search bar where you could type in the name "tebow" and may get a few answers. And to type u need to use letters on a thing they called keyboard. Just ask your kids for help.
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Re: Happy that kids are playing football in India: Thomas Mueller
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2012, 03:41:30 PM »

Terrible and misleading title.

Should say that happy that kids are playing SOCCER in India.

I got excited that India has started playing the real sport for a change and maybe Tebow may actually find a real team now (if Jesus is by him)

who the f**k is tebow...and what has Jesus got to do with it?! :evil4:

He is Jesus Christ. And Sri Krishna oiled into one. Go to a website called google.com. The. You will see a search bar where you could type in the name "tebow" and may get a few answers. And to type u need to use letters on a thing they called keyboard. Just ask your kids for help.

pity the ancients... ::Whip::
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