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dhruvdeepak

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Roland Garros Anyone?
« on: May 27, 2011, 01:39:12 PM »

?
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2011, 01:31:41 PM »

surprising that no one is following the french open. i've seen some good 5 setters so far

also note that sania mirza is in the women's doubles semi - her and her partner (some vesnini) have hammered out some dominating performances including a straight sets win over the #1 seeds

looks like federer v djoker in the semi and probably nadal v murray in the other one

no one watches women's singles anymore - though sharapova is looking good (tennis-wise)
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In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2011, 01:32:28 PM »

my suggestion for women's singles is to s*x it up. make it strip tennis. you lose an item of clothing for every break of serve
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In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.
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Blwe_torch

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2011, 03:39:39 PM »

Li Na dethrones Schiavone to win French Open title
AFP | Jun 4, 2011, 08.30pm IST


The 29-year-old from Wuhan defeated defending champion Francesca Schiavone of Italy 6-4, 7-6 (7/0)) to take her place in the pantheon of Chinese sports stars.

Li clinched the watershed win with a superb 7-0 tie-break performance in the second set, falling onto her back in the red dirt when Schiavone hit long on match point

It was a thrilling display of shot-making from the Chinese player who has said she hopes that by winning a Grand Slam title she will act as a catalyst for the growth of tennis in her giant homeland.

For 30-year-old Schiavone it was a bitter pill to swallow one year after she upset the odds to become Italy's first and so far only Grand Slam women's champion.

"I was 4-2 up and she tried to come back, but I just had to stand up again and I made it. I think everyone in China will be so excited," said Li.

"I was nervous but I didn't want to show my opponent."

Schiavone said: "She played well. I couldn't push her from the baseline. Then we were closer. One has to lose, one has to win. She deserved to win."

In what was the oldest Grand Slam singles final in 21 years, the combined ages of the two players was 60 years and 79 days.

Schiavone was looking to her claycourt expertise and experience of winning here last year to make the difference, while Li said that having played and lost a Grand Slam final already this year in Australia would help her confidence.

With the final broadcast live on television in China, where interest in her exploits has spiralled, Li had the first break point of the match on a sultry, still afternoon on the Philippe Chatrier centre court but she clattered a forehand long.

A tense, closely-fought start to the final pitted the wiry Schiavone's vicious top spin and tactical guile against the more powerful flat-hitting of the athletic Li and it was the Chinese seventh seed who drew first blood in the fifth game.

A poorly executed drop shot from Schiavone gave Li two break points and she took the second of these when an under-pressure Schiavone hit a forehand wide.

Li then held serve three consecutive times to take the first set 6-4 in 39 minutes and she looked in total charge of the final going into the second set.

She earned three more break points as Schiavone struggled to contain her weight of shot and the Chinese player let out a shout of triumph as she converted the final one of those.

Schiavone badly needed to find an answer to her opponent's domination and by throwing in some more variety in the next game she crafted her first break point of the final in the next game.

Li though swatted that aside with a big first serve and then confidently moved out into a 2-0 lead.

Another netted drop shot gave Li a further break point in the fifth game, but with the court wide open the sixth seed blasted a shoulder-high forehand into the net with a 4-1 lead on offer.

Li was proving steady as a rock on her own serve as she comfortably held for 4-2 and she saw another break point against Schiavone go astray in the next game.

The missed opportunities immediately came back to haunt her as she flung in three unforced errors when serving for a 5-3 lead and Schiavone pounced to secure her first service break of the match.

Both players then held serve twice to force the tie-break.

Li dominated that from the start, sweeping it 7-0, to gleefully write her name into the record books.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/events-tournaments/french-open-2011/top-stories/Li-Na-dethrones-Schiavone-to-win-French-Open-title/articleshow/8726774.cms

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Blwe_torch

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2011, 03:41:41 PM »

^^^^^^^^^

Now, this is a paradigm shift in Tennis.
Shall we see more Chinese and hopefully Indians too....winning Grand Slams, in the near future?
Let's not be on the wrong side of China..... :)
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dextrous

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2011, 03:57:48 PM »

blwe, chinese, yes. indians, no.

there's nothing in the pipeline after sania.

i expect somdev to make it to QF one day in either US or Australian opens..but no further...after somdev, there's a lad called yuki bhambhri who was ranked #1 in the world (juniors) but (i think) his parents gave bad advise and he stopped playingjuniors and has not been able to do anything on the pro-tour in a year or so. he's still young but didn't quite turn out to be a prodigy as he was supposed to be...but after yuki...nobody is coming up.
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Blwe_torch

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2011, 04:45:51 PM »

Well....when I posted 'near future'....I meant 10-15 years for India.
When I see Somdev...I see the future, that India may likely represent.
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2011, 05:57:35 PM »

Li Na dethrones Schiavone to win French Open title
AFP | Jun 4, 2011, 08.30pm IST


The 29-year-old from Wuhan defeated defending champion Francesca Schiavone of Italy 6-4, 7-6 (7/0)) to take her place in the pantheon of Chinese sports stars.

Li clinched the watershed win with a superb 7-0 tie-break performance in the second set, falling onto her back in the red dirt when Schiavone hit long on match point

It was a thrilling display of shot-making from the Chinese player who has said she hopes that by winning a Grand Slam title she will act as a catalyst for the growth of tennis in her giant homeland.

For 30-year-old Schiavone it was a bitter pill to swallow one year after she upset the odds to become Italy's first and so far only Grand Slam women's champion.

"I was 4-2 up and she tried to come back, but I just had to stand up again and I made it. I think everyone in China will be so excited," said Li.

"I was nervous but I didn't want to show my opponent."

Schiavone said: "She played well. I couldn't push her from the baseline. Then we were closer. One has to lose, one has to win. She deserved to win."

In what was the oldest Grand Slam singles final in 21 years, the combined ages of the two players was 60 years and 79 days.

Schiavone was looking to her claycourt expertise and experience of winning here last year to make the difference, while Li said that having played and lost a Grand Slam final already this year in Australia would help her confidence.

With the final broadcast live on television in China, where interest in her exploits has spiralled, Li had the first break point of the match on a sultry, still afternoon on the Philippe Chatrier centre court but she clattered a forehand long.

A tense, closely-fought start to the final pitted the wiry Schiavone's vicious top spin and tactical guile against the more powerful flat-hitting of the athletic Li and it was the Chinese seventh seed who drew first blood in the fifth game.

A poorly executed drop shot from Schiavone gave Li two break points and she took the second of these when an under-pressure Schiavone hit a forehand wide.

Li then held serve three consecutive times to take the first set 6-4 in 39 minutes and she looked in total charge of the final going into the second set.

She earned three more break points as Schiavone struggled to contain her weight of shot and the Chinese player let out a shout of triumph as she converted the final one of those.

Schiavone badly needed to find an answer to her opponent's domination and by throwing in some more variety in the next game she crafted her first break point of the final in the next game.

Li though swatted that aside with a big first serve and then confidently moved out into a 2-0 lead.

Another netted drop shot gave Li a further break point in the fifth game, but with the court wide open the sixth seed blasted a shoulder-high forehand into the net with a 4-1 lead on offer.

Li was proving steady as a rock on her own serve as she comfortably held for 4-2 and she saw another break point against Schiavone go astray in the next game.

The missed opportunities immediately came back to haunt her as she flung in three unforced errors when serving for a 5-3 lead and Schiavone pounced to secure her first service break of the match.

Both players then held serve twice to force the tie-break.

Li dominated that from the start, sweeping it 7-0, to gleefully write her name into the record books.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/events-tournaments/french-open-2011/top-stories/Li-Na-dethrones-Schiavone-to-win-French-Open-title/articleshow/8726774.cms

absolutely miserable to watch this after seeing the highlights of the men's semis. this is not professional sport.

anyways , good for chinese tennis
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In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.
-- Mohandas K *hi

dhruvdeepak

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2011, 06:00:37 PM »

btw Sania lost in the final of the women's doubles
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In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.
-- Mohandas K *hi

dhruvdeepak

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Re: Roland Garros Anyone?
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2011, 06:05:25 PM »

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/SPORT/tennis/06/03/china.li.na/


Beijing (CNN) -- Li Na was hugely popular in China long before she won Saturday's French Open final, becoming the first Asian tennis player to lift a grand slam singles title.
To many Chinese, "China's number one sister" is a maverick. She has a tattoo, has dyed her hair many different colors and has even been known to yell at her husband in public.
She cemented this rebellious reputation at the 2008 Beijing Olympics by telling her own fans to "shut up" when they got too vociferous in their support during every point she played against Russia's Dinara Safina. Unfortunately this reaction did not go down too well with her supporters. "It was a very bad experience," she told CNN. "Next time I will just ask them to be quiet!"
Tattoos are controversial for many Chinese and are often associated with bad behavior. But Li is not shy in showing off the rose which adorns her chest -- she told fans it is the symbol of her love for her husband


In late 2008, she quit China's tennis program and started her own team. With this new arrangement, she was able to choose her own coach and pay 8-12% of her winnings to the government compared with 65% in the past, according to Jiefang Daily, a government-run newspaper.
This means she is now responsible to her own financial security. Many in China consider this to be a very daring move for someone who has always been looked after by the Chinese sports system.
Li grew up in China's highly centralized and rigid sports program, a style adopted from the Soviet Union. The Chinese government invests heavily in sport and recruits athletes at a young age. Though this system has created a number of world champions across many sports, it is infamous for its strict management
and the sacrifices athletes are expected to make.
China's eyes on Li Na's final bid
At the age of six, Li was selected to play badminton at her local sports school. Her father, himself a badminton player, was keen for her to focus on this sport until her coach introduced her to tennis -- a game he said she would enjoy if she liked being in the sun.
Unfortunately these early memories were not always positive.
"I felt sad because everyday I had to wake up early to practice before going to school," she said. "After school I had to go back to tennis again, and then after tennis I had homework. I didn't have time to play."
Roland Garros: The dark secrets of a chic tennis stadium
But Li is a late bloomer. Her career has blossomed at the age 29, which is relatively old for professional women's tennis. The new world number four also became the first Asian woman to play in a grand slam final when she lost to Kim Clijsters at the Australian Open in January.
But following her victory in Paris, her popularity in China might even exceed that of NBA superstar Yao Ming.
"I would like to play as long as I can, maybe another two or three years." she told CNN. "I like children so hopefully afterwards I can have a baby."
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In the attitude of silence the soul finds the path in a clearer light, and what is elusive and deceptive resolves itself into crystal clearness. Our life is a long and arduous quest after Truth.
-- Mohandas K *hi
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