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vincent

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The paradox of Kerala
« on: March 17, 2010, 06:22:03 PM »

An intersting article on Kerala and its current state. It does not mention one fact that Kerala also is the only state which has a district with 100% literacy and one with 100% electricity for all.

The article,interstingly enough from a Bengali, does mention that Communism was good for the state in the 50ies. But fortunately, unlike Bengal, Kerala had alternative Governments (Communists or Congress) after almost every election, the next being the turn of Congress. But it is still sad to note that how far they could have gone if not for trade unions and the absolute lack of investments.

                 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8546952.stm

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flute

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2010, 07:22:32 PM »

vincent, good one..I too always thought why kerala is not forging ahead with all those good things we hear..Iguess the general answer is communism and unionism are holding it back.

I am also kind of surprised by references to church and their reforms earlier..is it really true? did those missionaries really help the soceity in general in improving social indicators? I thought kerala soceity since ancient times was matriarchal and hence many issues stemming from suppressing women are absent in kerala..if you know more about this, please elaborate
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sudzz

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2010, 04:16:19 AM »

I have not read this article for lack of time and Iam not a keralite either. But after having had travelled through Kerala a few times I can state that the relative prosperity of a Keralite as compared to people from other parts of India is very evident in the manner of their living.

While industrial progress has probably by passed the state but that does not mean that the state is backward in toto. If they can resolve their power issues I think the state is still a great place to live in.
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vincent

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2010, 09:18:18 AM »

vincent, good one..I too always thought why kerala is not forging ahead with all those good things we hear..Iguess the general answer is communism and unionism are holding it back.

I am also kind of surprised by references to church and their reforms earlier..is it really true? did those missionaries really help the soceity in general in improving social indicators? I thought kerala soceity since ancient times was matriarchal and hence many issues stemming from suppressing women are absent in kerala..if you know more about this, please elaborate

In the case of Kerala,it is hard to single out "missionaries" since Kerala has Christians since 2000 Years and they still form the majority of Christians there. The European "missionaries" - about 1500 years later - did accelerate the creation of the vast number of education and healthcare institutions. If I compare Kerala with the neighbouring southern Coastal Karnataka which has similar but not same characteristics as Kerala, I can say that the two most important factors for social progress are education and healthcare.

What is surprising in Kerala is the fact that the well educated and developped society believes in Communism and Unions. This may also have to do with the fact that the better educated people are working outside the state in India or in the western countries.

But I agree with Sudzz, that it probably is still a very nice place to live or visit. It would be great for the country if the Hindi-belt states would focus on education and healthcare of their citizens rather than on spending money on parties,statues and money-garlands.
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vincent

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2010, 09:25:50 AM »

vincent, good one..I too always thought why kerala is not forging ahead with all those good things we hear..Iguess the general answer is communism and unionism are holding it back.

I am also kind of surprised by references to church and their reforms earlier..is it really true? did those missionaries really help the soceity in general in improving social indicators? I thought kerala soceity since ancient times was matriarchal and hence many issues stemming from suppressing women are absent in kerala..if you know more about this, please elaborate

In the case of Kerala,it is hard to single out "missionaries" since Kerala has Christians since 2000 Years and they still form the majority of Christians there. The European "missionaries" - about 1500 years later - did accelerate the creation of the vast number of education and healthcare institutions. If I compare Kerala with the neighbouring southern Coastal Karnataka which has similar but not same characteristics as Kerala, I can say that the two most important factors for social progress are education and healthcare.

What is surprising in Kerala is the fact that the well educated and developped society believes in Communism and Unions. This may also have to do with the fact that the better educated people are working outside the state in India or in the western countries.

But I agree with Sudzz, that it probably is still a very nice place to live or visit. It would be great for the country if the Hindi-belt states would focus on education and healthcare of their citizens rather than on spending money on parties,statues and money-garlands.


NOTE: Now the above aricle has dozens of comments from readers. They are all of similar views about investments and communism.
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keep-it-cool

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2010, 12:44:11 PM »

vincent, good one..I too always thought why kerala is not forging ahead with all those good things we hear..Iguess the general answer is communism and unionism are holding it back.

I am also kind of surprised by references to church and their reforms earlier..is it really true? did those missionaries really help the soceity in general in improving social indicators? I thought kerala soceity since ancient times was matriarchal and hence many issues stemming from suppressing women are absent in kerala..if you know more about this, please elaborate

In the case of Kerala,it is hard to single out "missionaries" since Kerala has Christians since 2000 Years and they still form the majority of Christians there. The European "missionaries" - about 1500 years later - did accelerate the creation of the vast number of education and healthcare institutions. If I compare Kerala with the neighbouring southern Coastal Karnataka which has similar but not same characteristics as Kerala, I can say that the two most important factors for social progress are education and healthcare.

What is surprising in Kerala is the fact that the well educated and developped society believes in Communism and Unions. This may also have to do with the fact that the better educated people are working outside the state in India or in the western countries.

But I agree with Sudzz, that it probably is still a very nice place to live or visit. It would be great for the country if the Hindi-belt states would focus on education and healthcare of their citizens rather than on spending money on parties,statues and money-garlands.

It is very difficult to pin down whether this is cause or effect. It is quite possible that a lot of the migration happened because people were not able to find enough work within the state.

I believe things have improved now but it was almost impossible to run a private venture at one point without being held to ransom by trade unionists. Forget a business, it was common for engineering courses that normally take 4 years to drag on for 4.5-5 yrs as you would lose 6-12 months to strikes in college.
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feverpitch

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Re: The paradox of Kerala
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2010, 11:40:42 AM »

What is surprising in Kerala is the fact that the well educated and developped society believes in Communism and Unions.

Assuming this is true, can you think of a reason why?
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