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cricinfo

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Jats on fire!!
« on: August 16, 2008, 02:50:06 PM »

What are the chances that we will end up with a second medal ?

Three masketeers of Jats are our hopes ,all reached Q-Final in boxing. Lets hope they can make it happen!

1. Akhil Kumar  54 KG (Aug 18 against GOJAN Veaceslav - Moldova -17th in WC 07)
2. Jitender Kumar 51 KG(Aug 20 against BALAKSHIN Georgy-Russia - European Champion 06-medal contender)
3. Vijendar Kumar 75 KG (Aug 20 against GONGORA Carlos-Ecuador - Copa Romana Champion 06)

I think Akhil Kumar has the best  chance to make it to the S/F . Akhil's cousin Jitendar said that he lost a close one last time to Balakshin but Akhil did defeat Balakshin in past so he will get some tips from Akhil on the same.

Go India Go !
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poondu

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2008, 02:53:04 PM »

Absolutely. Cmon guys, more medals..
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achutank

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2008, 02:53:34 PM »

just saw the vijendra singh pre-quarters against a thai , his footwork is very good, though he does not throw a lot of punches, but he is effective when he finds openings, i thought he fought a very intelligent fight

i really really hope we get at least one medal in boxing this olymics, we have done more or less well in the past but never passed the quarters for a medal, this time i hope we can
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RicePlateReddy

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2008, 08:00:53 PM »

3 Indians in quarter finals is very fine indeed  :icon_thumleft:  :icon_thumleft:  :icon_thumleft:

I hope all 3 make it to semis.
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feverpitch

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2008, 02:41:38 AM »

to continue the jat analogy, akhil is a bit like our own veeru... has only one mode... attack... makes it fun to watch... the way he kept going at the russkie despite being punched up and groggy in the early rounds was almost suicidal... except that with hindsight it was what unnerved the World champion and helped akhil win...
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dextrous

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2008, 03:17:29 AM »

with boxing one needs to only move in semis to assure bronze i think!
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Blwe_torch

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2008, 05:32:02 AM »

Like a boxer, Haryana follows its instinct

NEW DELHI: Jitender Kumar was plucked out of obscurity; Vijender Singh was spotted in a talent hunt. These are just a couple of the gambles that are paying huge dividends for Indian boxing.

A year ago, Jitender, who stormed into the Beijing Games’ quarter-finals on Saturday, was struggling even at the state level.

But the Haryana boxing association took a chance by selecting him and sending him to the 2007 Guwahati National Games. He justified the faith by winning a gold.

"Jitender had not even made it to the semi-finals in the state-level competition. But we felt he had the talent to make it big," said Rakesh Thakran, secretary of Haryana Boxing Association. "He had fire in him and we could see that he wanted to excel.’’

Vijender, another boxer making an impact in Beijing, was spotted by the association in state school games in 2002.

After a few years of proper training, the pugilist from Bhiwani district was ready for the big league.

"He had the right physique to be a good boxer. He had good height and the right mentality too. The moment we saw him we knew we had discovered a top performer," Thakran said.

It’s not just Vijender or Jitender who made it big after being picked from nowhere; there are a host of other boxers who have followed a similar route to success.

Sunil Kumar, world cadet champion 2006, and Dilbagh, who failed to make it to Beijing narrowly, are a couple of products of the system followed by the boxing association in Haryana, the state that has produced the highest number of boxers in the country.
"We try to pick them at an early stage, give them proper training before unleashing them in the national sub-junior, junior and senior levels. After that it’s up to the national federation,’’ said Thakran, who’s also the co-ordinator of Indian Amateur Boxing Federation (IABF).

Once they reach that stage, the boxers are selected for national camps and given international exposure to prepare them for big events like Olympics.

"Just prior to these Games we sent the qualified boxers to Taiwan for the President’s Cup where all the top boxers of the world were present.

"Then a training-cum-competition programme in Germany prepared them properly for the Olympics. In between they had their regular camps at Patiala," said IABF executive director Azad Singh Daggar.

It’s for the first time ever that India sent five boxers to the mega event - Vijender, Jitender, Akhil Kumar, Dinesh Kumar and AL Lakra. Dinesh and Lakra crashed out in the first round itself, but the others have still kept India’s hopes alive.

IABF believes that their success at the world’s greatest show is no fluke; rather, it is the result of years of proper planning and hard work put in by the boxers and their coaches. "We have lot of faith on our boxers. They are no less than any other in the world. Their wins are not at all surprising,’’ Daggar said.

"They have beaten big names in the past and I am sure they will continue to do so in the future.’’

http://olympics.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Like_boxer_Haryana_follow_its_instinct/articleshow/3371899.cms
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justforkix

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2008, 05:34:23 AM »

with boxing one needs to only move in semis to assure bronze i think!

yes, there is no 3rd place fight - both SF losers get bronze.
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achutank

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2008, 06:59:09 AM »

with boxing one needs to only move in semis to assure bronze i think!

yes, there is no 3rd place fight - both SF losers get bronze.

i think even badminton and tt have the same funda. wonder why?
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Blwe_torch

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2008, 01:24:11 PM »

with boxing one needs to only move in semis to assure bronze i think!

yes, there is no 3rd place fight - both SF losers get bronze.

i think even badminton and tt have the same funda. wonder why?
.
no...i think, it is not the same for badminton and tt. I remember seeing a 3rd place match in badminton for the bronze. Ms. Yulianti of Indonesia, who defeated our Saina Nehwal won the bronze against a Chinese, Lu Lan.
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cricinfo

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Re: Jats on fire!!
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2008, 04:34:08 PM »

Interesting read on tactics taken by Indian boxers at Beijing to garner clear points

Bhiwani in Beijing:Two more Indian boxers near the medal zone

Mini Kapoor


Out of the oddly sleepless world of Indian boxing came India’s second and then third punch at a medal at these Beijing Games. A day after Akhil Kumar beat the bantamweight world champion to enter the quarterfinals, his Bhiwani teammate beat Uzbek flyweight Tulashboy Doniyorov in the round of 16. Seven hours later Vijender Kumar followed them into the middle-weight quarters, after defeating the favourite, Thailand’s Angkhan Chomphuphuang. (There is no bronze medal playoff for boxing at the Olympics, so a semifinalist is assured of at least a bronze.)

Last night, Jitender would not let his Bhiwani teammate sleep. He needed his mentor to calm his nerves. “I play in Akhil’s style,” he said minutes after taking the four-round bout 13:6. “During the match he kept telling me to be aggressive, then to back-pedal. When I’d be aggressive, I would get points. Then I’d back-pedal (to keep Doniyorov away).”

Akhil and Jitender are the small guys of boxing. At 54 kg and 51 kg, respectively, they walk and even stand as if on a trampoline. Like all most other boxers, they like to talk. They talk till they have to be dragged away. And in a sport drawn from the most primal fascination for a bloodfest, they bare hearts large enough to dream big and to give the credit for those dreams to anyone who’d care to wish them well.

So, a bronze or a silver will not do for me, says Akhil, I want gold. If I take a medal, it will be Akhil’s, says 20-year-old Jitender, he’s my mother, father, sister, brother.

Indian boxers have traditionally been uncomfortable with the scoring at international meets. In fact, scoring has been so contentious all-round that to write the history of boxing at the Olympics is to track the reform brought about to deal with biased judges, drunk judges, shortsighted judges, incompetent judges. But even if the judges be perfect, it is crucial that they catch it when a punch connects.

As India’s boxing coach, Gurbax Singh Sandhu, said later, “the strategy was to play the computer.” So, like Akhil yesterday, Jitender played from a distance, so that connected punches could be spotted. Jitender built on a good first round, having taken it 4:1.

A boxing match is over in 11 minutes, with four rounds of 2 minutes each, with a minute’s rest between each round. So, once a big lead had been conceded, the Uzbek’s anxiety grew. He’d lunge at Jitender, who kept backing away. By bout’s end, there was a desperation in Doniyorov’s lunges, as he probably figured he needed to knock down Jitender to make up for his points deficit. This way he played further into Jitender’s gameplan. As the Bhiwani boy said later, “I was loose, he was tight.” Jitender now meets Russian Georgy Balakshin on August 20.

Vijender, also of Bhiwani, found it in himself to make revenge sound like a tribute. “I had lost to Chomphuphuang two months ago,” he said past the midnight hour. “I don’t lose to the same boxer twice.”

But like his teammates, he knows that boxing may just be on the verge of a tipping point in India. This is already India’s best performance at the Olympics.

Indian boxing also has a smart thinking, charismatic man capable of drawing the interest of a wider audience and also of becoming a rallying point for young boxers.

Physiotherapist Heath Matthews says it is “exceptionally important” to have somebody like Akhil around: “His personality is incredibly infectious.” “Akhil Akhil hai,” says Sandhu.

Boxing, more than most other sports, feeds on human drama. As counterfoil to the brute aggression and sharp wits in the ring, its greatest dramas require gestures of decency, or the glaring lack of them. (Think Mohammed Ali and Mike Tyson for an example of the contrasts that keep fans interested.) At 27, with the experience of dashed hopes from a first-round defeat at Athens, Akhil has the flair to disarm with the clearly-phrased analysis.

Stories of his financial support to young boxers are softly recounted. His teammates — three of the five, like him, living within shouting distance of each other in Bhiwani—find themselves learning how to explain the boxer’s craft to enable an informed interest in the sport.

Matthews hints that one has to know the culture and context from where the boxers have come to understand their style. Himself smitten by Bhiwani, he explains that cricket is not the sport of choice there. “It is a modest community with a very strong boxing background.” After all, boxing is, paradoxically, not about aggression. It is, as the Bhiwani boys have showed this month, about expressing oneself.

http://www.indianexpress.com/sunday/story/349763.html
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