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kban1

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From Cricinfo blog the following about the 413 run partnership between Mankad & Roy:

Clayton Murzello, sports editor of Mid-Day, the Mumbai-based daily, looks back at the world-record opening partnership of 413 between Pankaj Roy and Vinoo Mankad in 1955-56 that Sehwag and Dravid came within an ace of breaking. Murzello wrote the tribute ten days earlier, not expecting the run-orgy by the Indian openers. Polly Umrigar, the former Indian captain who was there when Pankaj and Mankad tormented New Zealand, gives an eye-witness account. "Both played their shots and showed how determined they were by not giving their wicket away. Of course, Vinoo had his own way of going after the bowling.". Click here to read the tribute. And read Raju Bharatan's, the veteran Indian journalist, article on Pankaj Roy to get know more about the former Indian opener.

kban1's note: Presented below are both the reports alluded to in the piece


****************************************************************

The partnership

http://web.mid-day.com/sports/national/2006/january/127935.htm

Fifty and still unbeaten!
By: Clayton Murzello
January 7, 2006


The current Indian team can bask in glory of claiming ownership to a host of feats in the India section of record books: Highest Individual Score (Sehwag), Most Runs (Tendulkar) Highest Century Tally (again Tendulkar), Most Wickets (Kumble) et al.

But there’s one Test record, which they will probably not come near considering the eternal problem of finding quality openers: Vinoo Mankad and Pankaj Roy’s opening stand against New Zealand in 1955-56.

This day 50 years ago, Mankad and Roy (both deceased) put up 413, a mark which has never been surpassed, a performance which bears testimony to the duo’s ability and staying powers. They ended Day One at 234 for no loss.

Polly Umrigar, captain and next man in, at Chennai’s Corporation Stadium, watched Mankad and Roy embrace glory. He pulled out his praise brush for Mankad and spoke wholesomely about Roy. “Pankaj was a good player who never got enough recognition. After all, he got 3000 plus runs,” said Umrigar.

“Both played their shots and showed how determined they were by not giving their wicket away. Of course, Vinoo had his own way of going after the bowling,” said Umrigar.

Nari Contractor, another survivor from that team, couldn’t recall much about the Test. “Hell… you are making me go back a fifty years,” he exclaimed.

But the former India captain was spot on when it came to reeling off what transpired in the lead up to that Test. “Vinoo and Pankaj opened in the first Test in Hyderabad; Vijay Mehra opened with Vinoo in the second at Bombay while I opened with Mehra in Delhi.

“I had never opened in any class of cricket but was told that I would have to if Vinoo did not turn up. Pankaj got a hundred at number three in the fourth Test at Calcutta when I partnered Vinoo. In Madras, it was Vinoo and Pankaj,” recalled Contractor.

Contractor was slated to bat at number seven in Madras but Mankad (231) and Roy (173) before Umrigar ensured there was no chance to walk out.

“Vinoo was unorthodox — more bent on getting on the offensive than defensive but he also had tremendous powers of concentration. Pankaj was very technically correct. Like Vinoo, good concentration.

He got ruffled by genuine pace but then who doesn’t,” Contractor recalled. New Zealand, according to Contractor was a, “typical, steady attack. They had Bert Sutcliffe and John Reid in their batting line-up and a guy called Guy, who was in the top order.

“No catches were dropped when Vinoo and Pankaj batted. They just batted very, very well.”

Simple, yet effective words for a pair, who deserve better recognition in the roller coaster world of Indian cricket.


Proud captain Polly Umrigar:Concentration was the key to their batting

Why has this record stood for 50 years, is a fair question. Umrigar reckons that the current lot of openers don’t have the levels of concentration and determination to go the distance. “Today you find batsmen throwing it away after completing 30,” he said.

Contractor is more direct. “Records are there to be broken and someday this will be surpassed — maybe against a weak team like Zimbabwe. The chance of getting out at the start of the innings is better than later. That is the only practical reason I can think of,” he said.

Umrigar learnt a lesson in concentration while batting with Vijay Hazare in the 1952-53 series against Pakistan at the Brabourne Stadium. Umrigar raced Hazare to complete his hundred and was in a jubilant mood.

On reaching his ton, he signalled to the dressing room for some water. The next thing he noticed was Hazare walking towards him. “You have got your hundred, but I have yet to reach mine,” Hazare said.

“I knew then that I had disturbed his concentration by asking for water,” Umrigar said yesterday. He can never forget it.


Pranab Roy

DAD was very proud of the fact that he raced Vinoo uncle when it came to reaching 100 and 150 in that Test.

He was very disappointed at not getting to his double hundred. Just before he got out for 173, he got a note from his captain (Polly Umrigar) asking him to hit out.

When Vinoo uncle returned to the pavilion he admonished him for not getting his double. But Dad was only following orders. He never got the credit he deserved and this saddened him.

Ashok Mankad

It feels great to hear that today marks 50 years for that famous partnership. I am proud to be his son. My father did not talk about that partnership.

In fact, he did not talk cricket at home. Since he was travelling most of the time we did not have the opportunity to interact with him much.


Chandan Patankar (From the reserve bench)

Former India wicketkeeper Chandu Patankar, who made his Test debut in the previous Test in Calcutta, remembers seeing Mankad and Roy do the incredible from the reserve bench.

“There was nothing shocking about their batting. They were very good players who played their regular cricket,” said 75-year-old Patankar, who figured in a solitary Test for the country.

“Once the new ball was seen off, Pankaj was very, very good. Vinoo had already scored big hundreds so this was expected.”

In the course of the conversation, the former stumper recalled how during his time, the Indian team stayed with prominent citizens of the city and not in a hotel.

“Only the visiting team stayed in a hotel. I remember staying with one Mr Khalidi, who had a Persian wife,” Patankar said.
****************************************************************


***************************************************************

Pankaj Roy --Who was he ?

http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/2001/02/10/stories/0710028p.htm

Pankaj Roy was every bit Sourav's match

RAJU BHARATAN

THE PUNCH that Pankaj Roy packed in his `right' matched the zing that Sourav Ganguly brings to his `left'. Commentators today exult about the wallop that Sourav imparts to his cover-drive, deriving his `balance of power' at the wicket from sheer timing. Telecasters who so acclaim Sourav never really saw Pankaj Roy strike out a path of his own - for Bengal, East Zone and India. The man was every centimetre Sourav's match in the precision and decision with which he played an array of shots. I was with Pankaj right through his maiden overseas tour (England 1952). There was, to his cherubic countenance, a soulful warmth that saw Pankaj make friends. And keep them by never seeking to influence people. Pankaj Roy went to England as the finest young striker of a cricket ball in India. He knew (during that 1952 English summer) a scale of unforeseen failure that would have broken a less determined performer. In the land of Rudyard Kipling, Pankaj comprehended, early, the meaning of: ``If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster, And treat those two impostors just the same. Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!''

Man enough I beheld Pankaj Roy to be on tour, as he went through the trauma of registering no fewer than 5 ducks in 7 Test innings. The same Pankaj Roy was a different batsman altogether on India's maiden tour of the West Indies (in the first quarter of 1953), enjoying the best overseas series of his decade-long Test career (in the brighter conditions of the Caribbean) with a scoreline of 1 and 22; 49 and 0; 28 and 48; 85 and 150. With 383 runs (ave 47.87) from 8 innings in 4 Tests, Pankaj Roy's match- saving 150 in the fifth and final Sabina Park Test came as the tour de force, forcing Jeff Stollmeyer's West Indies to settle for a 1-0 series win. True, the quality of pace in the Caribbean then was not forbidding. But, if it is thus we plot the points on Pankaj Roy's careergraph, his best Test knock, I say, was against the thunderbolts of Roy Gilchrist and Wesley Hall. My reference is to the Vijay Merchant-hailed 90 that Pankaj Roy hit (on December 2 1958) to rescue Polly Umrigar's India from almost certain defeat (at the Brabourne Stadium) in the first Test of what turned out to be a genuinely fearsome series for our men.

A series in which Hall and Gilchrist peppered Pankaj Roy black and blue. No helmet, no thigh-pad, no nothing, yet Pankaj Roy stood exemplarily firm, for over 7 hours, in the Brabourne middle. And Pankaj Roy lived to be 72 without ever changing his attitude or approach to the game. His fearlessness as an opener, I saw, had been the same when he squared up to Cuan McCarthy, Freddie Trueman and Frank Tyson (the latter two as freshers) on the 1952 tour of England. There are those who view Pankaj Roy's 99, in the first Test vs Australia at Ferozeshah Kotla in December 1959, as his best India-opening effort. Only because radio listeners graphically remember the AIR commentator describing how Pankaj Roy (on 99) was psyched by Aussie skipper Richie Benaud into tapping that dolly catch into his short-leg hands (off Lindsay Kline)! Gritty as that 99 at Delhi vs Australia was, Pankaj Roy's one-year-earlier 90, at Bombay vs the West Indies, remains the bravest innings of his career. Chandu Borde has a point when he observes that today's batsmen (given all that protective equipment) never did have to face the calibre of pace that Gilchrist and Hall generated on our own pitches. And Pankaj Roy, do not forget, stood up to that awesome twosome right through the nerve-shattering 1958-59 series, at home, with resolution and resilience.

Moving beyond that 90 and 99, which of Pankaj Roy's 5 Test centuries for India do we flesh out as his best? The actuaries of the game would inevitably point to the 173 that this sturdy opener hit while partnering Vinoo Mankad (231) in that world- record opening stand of 413 during the fifth Test at Madras, against Harry Cave's New Zealand, in the first week of January 1956. But spectators rewinding to that 413-run stand, at the Corporation Stadium, would testify that those were runs struck against the weakest attack, at that point, in international cricket. And Roy was a Royal Bengal Tiger against anything short of peak pace! The chinks in his armour came to the fore only when confronted by genuine quicks on faster wickets abroad. That is why I pick out Pankaj Roy's Sabina Park 150 (hit against the pace of Frank King) as his best century knock for India.

Pankaj Roy was not one to yield his wicket cheaply - as a solid striker of the ball with a range of shots that generally saw him weather the new-ball threat to reserve his best stroke production for spin. Off the back-foot, Pankaj Roy (with that super square- cut) could be positively murderous.

Chepauk was captive witness to Pankaj's power-play as he hit that 1952 tour place-clinching 111 in the February 1952 fifth Test vs Donald Carr's England. That Chepauking-size hundred, coming as a follow-up to his stroke-laden 140 in the second Test at the Brabourne Stadium during the same 1951-52 series, prompted Leslie Smith (covering the tour for Reuters) to pronounce Pankaj Roy to be India's finest prospect for the tour of England on the anvil.

Was Pankaj Roy then overrated? Not at all, if only because it was a seasoned writer spotting the spark in a thoroughbred. That spark had to be sustained, of course. Only assessed by this yardstick did Pankaj Roy, at times, fall short. Otherwise, his 2442 runs (ave 32.56) from 79 innings in 43 Tests for India (with 5 hundreds and 9 fifties) are not figures to dismiss lightly, always remembering that this Bengal Trojan opened in times when the new ball posed a chronic problem for this nation still nascent in international cricket. The number of Test ducks (14) against Pankaj Roy's name could certainly have been fewer, but then this is where his mental block began. Once the `zero hour' was past, Pankaj Roy generally took root to captivate viewers with his shot-making pedigree. The 11,868 runs (ave 42.38) and 33 centuries he hit, in a career spanning 22 years, saw Pankaj Roy hold his India slot on sheer performance.

Yet there was an inherent contradiction in the man's batting. For instance, Pankaj Roy looked dead-set as he grafted 35 while opening with Vinoo Mankad in that reassuring stand of 106, as the famous Lord's Test of June 1952 got underway. After looking the picture of security during that 35 came, inexplicably, 4 (of those 5) Test ducks in a row. And Pankaj Roy was only marginally a better proposition, as he returned to England for the 1959 tour. In a team of lambs ready for slaughter, he had a Test scoreline of 54 and 49; 15 and 0; 2 and 20; 15 and 21; 3 and 0. But, in the second Test at Lord's, he led India with aptitude and imagination (in Dattajirao Gaekwad's absence). In fact, in the BBC round-up (strictly for India) at the end of a 5-0 sweep by England, `Vizzy' even asked Dattu Gaekwad whether he felt it would have made a difference if Pankaj Roy had led India in his place! ``I don't want to answer that question!'' was Dattu Gaekwad's ultra-bold response. Dattu Gaekwad never captained India again.

Nor did Pankaj Roy skipper India again, after it had been established that (like Sourav Ganguly) the man had admirable qualities of leadership. The shots Pankaj brought off, if Sourav could but get to glimpse them now! They would have Ganguly wondering what Pankaj lacked that he commands. Through the covers, Pankaj sent the ball to the fence like streaked lightning. And Pankaj, helmetless, was a fierce hooker, getting better `inside the line' than does Sourav. Plus Pankaj was no less dominant against spin than Sourav.

If Pankaj faltered, it was only against the highest class of pace. And that mainly on pitches abroad in conditions alien to him. Could Sourav say that he is any more certain than was Pankaj in a `seaming atmosphere' abroad?

There is thus nothing I see Sourav doing, today, that Pankaj did not do equally resourcefully with the willow. This should be manifest from the fact that Pankaj Roy stayed the Test course through 11 series in an era during which team selection, in India, was a matter of whim when not fancy. Pankaj Roy's aggregate of 334 (ave 33.40) from 10 innings in the 5 Tests of 1958-59 (against Gerry Alexander's West Indies in India) underscores the spirit animating the man's cricket. Pankaj Roy fairly proved himself against the mighty West Indies, England and Australia, the three great powers in the game during the time he represented India.

Pankaj Roy never let failure get to him. In fact, the setbacks he suffered taught Pankaj one thing - never to neglect his fielding. This is one area in which the stocky frame of Pankaj comes through as Sourav's superior. Pankaj (like Sourav) loved football, but cricket was his passion. Pankaj Roy never gave anything less than 100 per cent to the team, attracting as much notice in holding the 16 catches he did, in Tests, as in scoring nearly 2500 runs for India.

The fact that the maximum quantum of those runs for India, 717 at 39.83, came from 18 innings in 9 Tests against the West Indies is proof positive that Pankaj Roy never shirked his role as opener. Having begun his international career as an opener alongside a Vijay Merchant scoring a masterly 154 (in the November 1951 first Test at Kotla vs Nigel Howard's England), Pankaj Roy knew, from the outset, what it took to be India's No. 1 against a paceman of Brian Statham's fire and fibre. Now, when Brian Statham is no more, Pankaj Roy is no less - as one who drove straight with flair. The image, it will endure.






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fineleg

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2006, 05:31:08 PM »

saddest thing...Viru / RD deserved the record.

But alas, perhaps no play and NOT OUT would have been better in our minds????? What do u think?
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2006, 06:34:51 PM »

record shmecord. Viroo's professed his disdain for such trifling things by whomping sixes when he approaches one.
Dravid would not have been pleased though :D
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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2006, 06:37:13 PM »

Wish everyone could think like VS. He is on a different planet. Only thing he needs now is to stop competing with Inzi in Parantha eating contest.

That was some Belly.  ;D ;D ;D
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toney

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2006, 06:38:04 PM »

dhruv, Veeru did seem a bit disappointed. I mean, a 50 year old record, one that is not entirely for yourself but is shared (like the RD VVS partnership), perfect opportunity to rub it further in, make the Pak players grumpier.... the possibilities were endless...
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fineleg

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2006, 06:59:04 PM »

Read the news guys (rediff, if u accept its news :)
Viru disappointed.
Dravid NOT disappointed.

Ulta to what u thought.
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kban1

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2006, 07:06:06 PM »

fineleg:

did u see dravid's reaction when veeru was dismissed ?

That should tell you that Dravid wanted the record.
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fineleg

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2006, 07:08:51 PM »

fineleg:

did u see dravid's reaction when veeru was dismissed ?

That should tell you that Dravid wanted the record.

I did not see it - hopefully, I can get to watch highlights or recording - let me know if u have URL link to that.
Viru probably would have been too.

What was Dravid's reaction? I know hard to write it in words, but can u try so I can visualize?
Thx.
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kban1

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2006, 07:10:42 PM »

Darvid took a swipe at the ground  with his bat --dust flew. just an expression of disappointment. Quite natural, not criticising him, but was obvious he was disappointed.
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fineleg

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2006, 07:14:02 PM »

Darvid took a swipe at the ground  with his bat --dust flew. just an expression of disappointment. Quite natural, not criticising him, but was obvious he was disappointed.

i feel very sad. Should VS have toned it down, i mean he tried two swipes at Rana...just 4 singles between him and RD wudve sealed it.
I feel for both of them, and perhaps VS could have used better judgement.

Maybe VS plays like that for his "own" records, but here RD had a part in it, and probably some responsible shot would have been much appreciated. Well done guys, neverthless...Those Pakis got what they deserved.
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dhruvdeepak

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2006, 07:56:13 PM »

bottom line, the record is not that important. the result of the mauling is.
cmon let's forget about this. it's something to marvel at, but that's where it should stop.
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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2006, 08:11:27 PM »

kban1,
Thanks for the excellent compilation. Most of us haven't seen the 50 year old record being made. But reading the articles, one does feel nostalgic. Thanks once again for posting.
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gouravk

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2006, 10:21:09 PM »

Yup. Who wants to have a player who PLAYS FOR RECORDS ??/ If they come its great, if not just move on. Play for the team and play for the fun of the game for Gods sake.
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toney

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2006, 10:28:53 PM »

Yup. Who wants to have a player who PLAYS FOR RECORDS ??/ If they come its great, if not just move on. Play for the team and play for the fun of the game for Gods sake.

GK, in this case, it is different. There is nothing left in the game other than the record. To be frank, even the Pak team must have been thinking of it when they came out. Not criticizing Veeru here but maybe, he should have played with a bit more caution. But then, none of us would  have complained if his shot fetched the runs. And I can perfectly understand RD's disappointment. How many times do you get this chance? Imagine remembering, 50 years down the line, RD and VS saved India with an unbelievable unbeaten partnership of 414!!
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gouravk

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2006, 10:31:56 PM »

Yes, but VS is not the sort of player to make compromises ever. If you force him to do so you will destroy him and the great value he brings to the team.

Disappoiniting for a bit, sure. But that disappointment will be quickly forgotten when one remembers the joy VS has given us in this inns and all thru his career.
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toney

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2006, 10:39:50 PM »

Yes, but VS is not the sort of player to make compromises ever. If you force him to do so you will destroy him and the great value he brings to the team.

Disappoiniting for a bit, sure. But that disappointment will be quickly forgotten when one remembers the joy VS has given us in this inns and all thru his career.


Nobody is denying that. Perhaps, he should still give a little weight to such once-in-a-lifetime opportunities. Once again, not criticizing VS
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When intelligence matures and lodges securely in the mind it becomes wisdom. When wisdom is integrated with life and becomes action it becomes Bhakti. Knowledge when it becomes fully mature is Bhakti. To believe that Jnana and Bhakti, knowledge & devotion, are different from each other is ignorance.

gouravk

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2006, 10:40:42 PM »

Well we have the likes of SRT to milk out every possible record isnt it ??
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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2006, 10:28:56 AM »

Great compilation kban1!
Yes..both Veeru and RD were rather dismayed.
In fact Veeru admitted that they had come down to bat just for the World record.
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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2006, 10:56:08 AM »

fineleg:

did u see dravid's reaction when veeru was dismissed ?

That should tell you that Dravid wanted the record.

Are we not assuming that the disappointment was for not getting to the record...I would tend to think otherwise...It would be more to do with losing a wicket....And given Sehwag's statements the previous day...a wicketless close to the Indian innings would have been something that the team could have brandied around for the entire series...That to me...... would have been the clear winner
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kban1

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Re: The 50 year record that survived (by a whisker) -- Ahhh, Veeru!!!
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2006, 03:15:50 PM »

Ravi:

it was obvious the only reason they were there was for the record. The light was fading --really not fit to be played. Viru's continued attempts to get those runs in a hurry contributed to the loss of the wicket.

A pysch advantage would not have been surrendered via the loss of one wicket, IMHO. Of course all of this is an interpretation but Dravid's expresiion and reaction spoke a 1000 words.

I am not blaming your next door neighbor ;D, his disappointment would be natural. But, IMO, he was disappointed. As poised and dignified he is, he internalized it and never expressed a word in the press conference (based on the reports) -- I do think RD deserves credit for that.

but private feeling and public expression do not necessarily have to coincide do they ?
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